15

[MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY]. Mutiny of the HMS Bounty covered in 2 issues of the Northampton Mercury. Vol. LXXI. Northampton: T. Dicey & Co., 30 October 1790, 27 March 1790.

Each issue 4pp., folio, approx. 12 1/2 x 18 3/4 in., or smaller. (Each disbound, some chipping and loss at edges and corners, occasional spotting or soiling). 27 March 1790 issue is No. 3, while 30 October 1790 issue was previously trimmed along top edge, so issue number is no longer visible.

The March issue contains an inside page, quarter-length column early report of the Mutiny on the Bounty, while the October issue contains a quarter-length column essay speculating on the reasons for the Mutiny on the Bounty and the establishment of a force to search for the perpetrators of it.

The mutiny on the Royal Navy vessel HMS Bounty occurred in the South Pacific Ocean on 28 April 1789. Disaffected crewmen, led by Lieutenant Fletcher Christian, seized control of the ship from their captain, Lieutenant William Bligh, and set him and eighteen loyalists adrift in the ship's open launch. The mutineers variously settled on Tahiti or on Pitcairn Island. Bligh navigated more than 3,500 nautical miles in the launch to reach safety, and began the process of bringing the mutineers to justice.

Bounty had left England in 1787 on a mission to collect and transport breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies. A five-month layover in Tahiti, during which many of the men lived ashore and formed relationships with native Polynesians, led many men to be less amenable to military discipline. Relations between Bligh and his crew deteriorated after he began handing out increasingly harsh punishments, criticism and abuse, Christian being a particular target. After three weeks back at sea, Christian and others forced Bligh from the ship. Twenty-five men remained on board afterwards, including loyalists held against their will and others for whom there was no room in the launch.

After Bligh reached England in April 1790, the Admiralty dispatched HMS Pandora to apprehend the mutineers. Fourteen were captured in Tahiti and imprisoned on board Pandora, which then searched without success for Christian's party that had hidden on Pitcairn Island. After turning back towards England, Pandora ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef, with the loss of 31 crew and four prisoners from Bounty. The ten surviving detainees reached England in June 1792 and were court-martialed; four were acquitted, three were pardoned and three were hanged.

Christian's group remained undiscovered on Pitcairn until 1808, by which time only one mutineer, John Adams, remained alive. Almost all of his fellow mutineers, including Christian, had been killed, either by each other or by their Polynesian companions.

Starting Price: $400
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Internet Bidding
 

Have a Similar Item?

Consign With Us
 

SHIPPING & PICKUPS 

Cowan’s Cincinnati Office offers an in-house, full-service shipping department which is unparalleled in the auction industry. Shipping costs are provided with your finalized invoice 24-48 hours after auction. For furniture and oversized items, we recommend using third-party services. For more information, click HERE or contact cowansshipping@hindmanauctions.com.  

NOTE: All pickups and preview are by appointment only. To make an appointment, please call 513-871-1670 or email cincinnati@hindmanauctions.com