June 22, 2018 10:00 AM EDT Cincinnati


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1

Blown and Cut, Etched Glass Wine Goblet Commemorating the Capture of Gibraltar in 1704

Glass wine goblet, 4.625 in. ht., featuring detailed etching of the British Fleet on the water, with floral motif below, accompanied by the text, "Capture of Gibralter [sic] / By the British Fleet 1704." Starburst design cut on underside of foot. 

The position of Gibraltar, which guards the entrance to the Mediterranean, has been fought over by France, Spain, and Britain for many years, with all powers claiming possession. On August 4, 1704, during the Spanish Succession, Gibraltar was captured from the Spanish by an Anglo-Dutch fleet under the command of Admiral George Rooke. Starting at dawn, approximately 15,000 cannon were fired from the fleet into the city, and under the leadership of the English majority, the invaders landed on the same morning, encountering little opposition from the Spanish. 

Starting Price: $400
Estimate: $800 - $1,000
Internet Bidding

2

Connecticut Courant Covering Pre-Revolutionary War Activities in the American Colonies and English Celebration of Yom Kippur, 1765

The Connecticut Courant, and Weekly Intelligencer. Hartford, CT: Thomas Green, February 11, 1765. Vol. 1. No. 12. 4pp, 8.75 x 14 in. 

Important pre-Revolutionary War Colonial American newspaper containing coverage of the British North American Colonies just before the passage of the Stamp Act by Great Britain. This issue also contains an inside page article describing the Jewish High Holiday of Yom Kippur being observed in London, England (page two, first column). 

Volume 1, Issue 12 of what is considered the oldest continuously published newspaper in the United States. 

Starting Price: $400
Estimate: $800 - $1,000
Internet Bidding

3

Rare Pre-Revolutionary War Newspaper, Rivington's New-York Gazetteer; or, the Connecticut, Hudson's River, New Jersey, and Quebec Weekly Advertiser, 1774

Rivington’s New-York Gazetteer: or, the Connecticut, Hudson’s River, New Jersey, and Quebec Weekly Advertiser. New York, NY: James Rivington, April 21, 1774. No. 53. 4pp, 11.5 x 18.25 in.

Exquisitely rare American Colonial newspaper title in and of itself, printed one year before the start of the Revolutionary War. The issue contains inside page, local New York City coverage of the April 1774 New York "Tea Party," in which the New York "Sons of Liberty" forced the British East India Company Tea Ship Nancy under the command of Captain Benjamin Lockyer to return to England without unloading the "detested tea" in New York City. This "Tea Party" was one of several that happened in the British North American colonies following the Boston Tea Party on December 14, 1773, and like the momentous actions in Boston, they were efforts to refuse tea shipments and to impose a boycott of the East India Company's product.

In addition, the issue features a lengthy, inside page letter sent to John Hancock, leader of the patriots of Massachusetts who had just finished with their own "tea party," as well as a female slave for sale advertisement. 

Starting Price: $1,000
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Internet Bidding

4

Revolutionary War General Richard Montgomery, Exceptionally Rare War-Date ANS, August 18, 1775

ANS, 6 x 7.25 in., Ticonderoga, August 18, 1775. Signed "Richd. Montgomery, Brig. Genl." Addressed to Major Elmore or Officer Commanding Crown Point.

You will please to order the sloop to sail immediately with Majr. Brown & John Baptiste Fere(?) if the wind permit - if not - Majr. Brown is to be furnished with a boat & such party as he requires. I am Sr. Your most obt. Srvt. Richd. Montgomery, Brig. Genl.

After the appointment of George Washington to lead the Continental Army, Congress commissioned Philip Schuyler as Major General and Richard Montgomery as a Brigadier and deputy to Schuyler. The two were given the goal of invading Canada. Troops began assembling at Fort Ticonderoga.

Schuyler decided to petition the Six Nations (Iroquois) to remain neutral during the military operations. On 27 August 1775, Schuyler wrote to George Washington: "I left Ticonderoga on thursday the 17th Instant and hoped to have returned in four days, but on my arrival at Saratoga I received Information that a large body of Indians of the Six nations were to be here as on tuesday last, And that my presence was Indispensibly necessary....

"I thank your Excellency for the honor you have done me in communicating me your plan for an Expedition Into Canada. The Inclosed Information of Fere's which Corroborates not only the Information of Major Brown, that Contained in the two Affiidavits of Duguid & Sharford, but Every other we have had leaves not a trace of doubt on my mind as to the propriety of going into Canada... And I have Accordingly since my Arrival here, requested Gen: Montgomery to get every thing in the best readiness he could, for that I would move Immediately...."

Clearly this communication is part of that process, as Montgomery is getting Fere and Brown in place. This note was written the day after Schuyler left for Saratoga. Brown had been spying in Canada, and on September 17th with 80 men he attacked Fort St. John, but was driven back. He had, however, destroyed a key bridge and captured supplies intended for the fort, so it was not totally unsuccessful. A month later, with a larger force that included 300 Canadians, Brown laid siege to Fort Chambly. The second action was successful, and Fort St. John followed shortly after.

The Americans then attacked Montreal and it, too, fell. The Continentals then turned their attention to Quebec, but it was getting late in the year, the army was ill-prepared for winter, and many men returned home to wait for better conditions. Many more had enlistments that expired in the new year. So on New Year's Eve, December 31, Brown made a diversionary attack on the upper city while Montgomery, along with Benedict Arnold, attacked the lower town. Montgomery was killed in the first volley from the walled town. Arnold was wounded, Brown failed, handing the Continentals their first major defeat of the Revolutionary War.

John Brown of Pittsfield (1744-1780) was also a Massachusetts judge and legislator, as well as an Army officer. He participated later in Burgoyne's invasion of the United States. He later was the first to bring charges against Benedict Arnold.

Richard Montgomery (1736-1775) was born in Ireland. After attending Trinity College, where he earned a reputation as being very studious, spending much of his time in the library. He enlisted in the British army after Trinity, and came with his regiment to North America during the French and Indian War. He returned to England in 1765, but after leaving service in 1772, he came to America to settle.

Starting Price: $2,000
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
Internet Bidding

5

Archive from the Stone/Sparhawk Families of Massachusetts

Collection of 100+ items, including original letters and a variety of other ephemera from the family archives of the Stone and Sparhawk families of Massachusetts. The collection spans roughly a century with the first letter dating to 1818 and later correspondence dating to the early 1900s. 

The patriarch of the Stone family was Ebenezer Whitten Stone (1801-1880). Stone was born in Massachusetts and entered the Army in 1817. When he left in 1821 he became a prosperous merchant in the Boston area, first in clothing, then in drugs, paints and dyes from 1843-1850. He married Catharine Louisa Whitcomb on November 22, 1825. Catharine was the daughter of Tilly Whitcomb who served as manservant to John Quincy Adams in Europe and later went on to serve as proprietor of the Boston Concert Hall and a hotel in Quincy, MA. (Catharine Louisa Stone was likely named after First Lady Louisa Catherine Adams.) The couple settled eventually in Roxbury, MA

When Ebenezer Stone left the Army, he enlisted in the Boston City Guards, part of the Massachusetts Militia and worked his way through the ranks of the guard. In 1830, he was admitted to the Ancient and Honorable Artillery. He held local civil positions as well, as a representative to the General Court and later, as a councilman in RoxburyIn 1851 he was appointed Adjutant General of Massachusetts. He made his first priority a complete inventory of arms, equipment and organization of the state militia. He recommended purchasing new percussion muskets and suggested a state-wide militia encampment with training. He eventually wrote the "Digest of the Militia Laws of Massachusetts."

Ebenezer and Catharine had at least seven children, including Catherine, Elizabeth (Lizzie), Mary, Ebenezer Jr., Caroline (Carrie), Frances and Henry. Ebenezer Sr. died in 1880, nearing his 70th year. He does not show up in the 1880 census, but Catharine and five children are still listed as living in the home. Somewhat interestingly, three of the daughters whose letters are part of this archive do not seem to have married. Most notable of the Stone children was Ebenezer Whitten Stone Jr., who enlisted as a captain on 5/22/1861 and was commissioned into "D" Co. of the Massachusetts 1st Infantry and later was commissioned into Field & Staff of the MA 61st Infantry. He achieved the rank of colonel by brevet for his services rendered in constructing a covered way near Fort Mahone under severe enemy fire. 

The connection between the Stone and Sparhawk families comes through marriage. The Stone's eldest daughter Catherine Louisa Stone married David W. Sparhawk in 1850. David Sparhawk was born in Portsmouth, NH, to a prosperous farmer and merchant. David went on to become a successful businessman in his own right operating as a wool dealer in the Boston area. David and Catherine Sparhawk's children are represented in this archive along with the Stone descendants.

Stone/Sparhawk family members and other figures represented in the archive include Ebenezer Whitten Stone, Sr., Major General Appleton Howe, Gen. George H. Devereaux, Brig. Gen. O.O. Howland, Naval Surgeon Eugene Potter Stone, Cadet Midshipman George Sparhawk, and more.

In addition to an extensive amount of family correspondence, the collection includes indentures, stock certificates, miscellaneous advertisements, receipts, and 19 century imprints. Highlights and unique elements of the archive include the following:

City Gazette, Extra. Conscription notice dated July 16, 1863, for the City of Roxbury, with references to General Meade, Fort Independence, 42nd Regiment, and “... three 'citizens of color'...” in Beverly, MA, who were conscripted. Full periodical name Roxbury City Gazette and South End Advertiser, published from 1863-1866, William H. Hutchinson, Editor. A rare newspaper with WorldCat listing just three institutions holding copies of the publication.

A military style patch accompanied by a handwritten note reading in its entirety, "Badges worn by the Revolutionary Soldiers at the laying of the Bunker Hill Monument corner stone 1825 in presence of Lafayette.”

Stock certificates, one from the Champlain Copper Mining Company dated 11 April, 1864, and bearing the signature of Ebenezer W. Stone as President. The Champlain Copper Mining Company of Boston was certified on March 30, 1864, and dissolved in 1872. Accompanying this is a list of stockholders in the company and their shares, with a note on back stating that the document was a “List of Original stockholders of Champlain Copper Co./owing to the violation of Jerome Merritts pledge the Company did not succeed in disposing of the stock.” Also included is a stock certificate from 1861 for the Cliftondale Railroad Company with a James Stone listed as Treasurer. Both appear to be rare.

Discharge document dated April 22, 1850, announcing that Lt. Col. Ebenezer W. Stone is honorably discharged from the Office of Inspector of the First Division of the Militia of the Commonwealth, signed by General George H. Devereaux, Adjutant General, who would be replaced the following year by Stone.

Letter from Dr. Eugene Potter Stone, signed “Genie,” written to his “Aunt Kate,” ie. Catherine L. Stone Sparhawk, written from Barnes’ Hospital, US Soldiers’ Home near DC, 1885, with reference to a “negro cavalry” (9th cavalry) going to Ft. McKinney and the Chaplain described as the “only colored officer in army”. 

Book titled Sophia Morton, Boston: Bowles and Dearborn, 72 Washington Street, 1827. Front cover missing.

Periodical, very early edition, The Mother’s Assistant, and Young Lady’s Friend, Boston: William C. Brown, Publisher and Editor, July 1843. Missing rear cover.

Book titled The Hours; Being Prayers for The Third, Sixth, and Ninth Hours with Preface. London: James Burns, 17 Portman Street, 1847. Seems to be rare. No listing on WorldCat for 1847 edition, and only 4 print editions listed total (2 from 1843 -both at British Library- and 2 from 1880). Binding is gone, held together with pins. Losses to several rear pages.

Starting Price: $1,000
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Internet Bidding

6

Revolutionary War Bounty Land Deeds, Collection of 26 Signed Over to Solomon Maxfield

Lot of 26 land deeds to property in Western Pennsylvania given as bounty to Revolutionary War soldiers. Each deed is for 400 acres. Each deed, except one, is made out to Solomon Maxfield and printed by Joseph Cruickshank, and dated in 1794. The one exception is also for 400 acres, Godfrey Gold to Samuel Wallis, and dated 1785 (no month or day). The majority of the others were paid on 14 December 1792, with another half-dozen or so dated 25 February 1793. Most were filed in 1794, and witnessed by Peter Notley. These 25 are all in the County of Luzerne or Northumberland, State of Pennsylvania. The other one is also Northumberland Co.

Solomon Maxfield is stated as being a Merchant from New Castle, Delaware. We have been unable to find him in any other records, but it was not uncommon for land speculators to buy up war Bounty Lands, and it was a way to turn the land grants into cash for those with no intention of moving hundreds of miles from home. It would appear that Mr. Maxfield was one of those speculators. Luzerne County was formed from part of Northumberland County in 1786, which is probably why some deeds say "Luzerne or Northumberland" - boundaries were not clear. (Later three other counties were formed from Luzerne County.) This region would become a center of anthracite coal mining after the turn of the 19th century.

Starting Price: $300
Estimate: $600 - $800
Internet Bidding

7

Revolutionary War Relic Cane Made of Wood from the HMS Augusta

Wooden cane, 35.25 in. ln., with sterling silver knob engraved: "John Read Dilworth/ This cane made from wood of the British Frigate Augusta sunk at the battle of Red Bank, October 23rd 1777/ Captain John Dilworth of the British Navy/ On his ship the Roebuck led the Augusta Up the Delaware River." No further information has been found regarding Captain J.R. Dilworth.

The Revolutionary War-era Battle of Red Bank occurred on the Delaware River near Fort Mercer, and involved six British ships, including the 64-gun man-of-war Augusta, which were engaged by smaller American gunboats. During the engagement, the Augusta along with the sloop-of-war Merlin ran aground on a shoal trying to avoid a series of underwater man-made obstructions that had been designed to pierce the hulls of intruding British warships. Despite the best efforts of the HMS Roebuck to drag the Augusta off the shoal, it wouldn't budge. On the morning of October 23, 1777, the British ships were engaged by Fort Mifflin and the Pennsylvania Navy, and by the afternoon, the Augusta had caught fire. The fire spread quickly, and within the hour, the warship exploded. Soon after, the crew of the Merlin abandoned the ship and set it on fire. The Augusta is considered the largest British vessel lost in combat by the Royal Navy in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

8

French POW Carving Dated 1810, Dedicated to Captain John Mitford, British Navy

Unique, folk art carved wooden relic in the form of a large handled instrument with wooden and metal tines, 13.25 in. ln. An anchor surrounded by leaves as well as the following name is carved in low relief along the top of the handle: "Captain Mitford. Royal Navy." The underside of the handle features a highly detailed carving of a seahorse, with intricate, low relief carvings below the seahorse's head, including arms holding up a boar's head on a dagger, a shield decorated with turtles, and floral and leaf motifs. The date "1810" is carved below the seahorse's long tail. The following phrases are carved along each side of the top of the handle's thin rim, one side carved in the French language, with translations included: "Cut by Henrion Whilst Prisoner on the Island of Cabrera / Grotto"; and "Hannibals Espoir [Hope] / La Misere est la Mere de L'Industrie [Misery is the Mother of Industry]." With the words "Jilblas" and "Santillan" carved along each side of the curved end of the fork-like portion of the instrument. This may be a reference to L'Histoire de Gil Blas de Santillane, a picaresque novel by Alain-René Lesage published between 1715 and 1735.

The name "Captain Mitford," likely refers to John, or Jack, Mitford, (1782-1831) a British naval officer, poet, and journalist who is best known for writing the book, The Adventures of Johnny Newcome in the Navy. He served with the Royal Navy from 1795-1811, participating in both the French Revolutionary Wars as well as the Napoleonic Wars. In 1810, the date referenced on the carved instrument, Mitford served as acting-master of the brig Philomel in the Mediterranean.

While no further information has been discovered regarding the carver, "Henrion," he was almost certainly one of the 9,000+ French prisoners of war that were exiled to the bleak Island of Cabrera in the Mediterranean following their surrender to Spanish forces at the Battle of Bailen. This was the first ever open field defeat of the Napoleonic army that occurred in July 1808. By the time the prisoners were repatriated to France after Napoleon’s defeat five years later, their number had dwindled to approximately 2,500.

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

9

Rare Hand-Colored Engraving of War of 1812 Engagement Between American Forces and Tecumseh

Hand-colored engraving, 8.125 x 14.75 in. (sight, including margins), framed, 9.75 x 16.25 in. A View of Col. Johnson's Engagement with the Savages (Commanded by Tecumseh) near the Moravian Town, October 5, 1812. Abel Bowen, 1828. 

A dramatic engraving portraying the battle between American forces under the command of Colonel Richard M. Johnson and American Indians under the command of Tecumseh, who were allied with the British. Detailed action is presented at center, with Johnson on horseback engaged with an Indian wielding a tomahawk, an American soldier engaging with an Indian, and an Indian in the act of scalping a fallen soldier. Tecumseh is shown standing in the foreground, at the far right. Significant elements of the scene are numbered and described in a corresponding key printed below.

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

10

Repulsion of the British at Fort Erie, War of 1812 Lithograph

Lithograph, 7 x 10.25 in. (image), 8.5 x 10.75 in. (sight, including margins), matted and framed, 15.75 x 17.5 in. Repulsion of the British at Fort Erie. On the 15th of August 1814, at 2 O'Clock A.M. Philadelphia, PA: P.S. Duval, lithographer, 1841. On Stone by James Queen. After painting by E.C. Watmough. A colorful, dramatic representation showing the ill-fated British attack on Fort Erie, which occurred between August 14-15, 1814, with the American and British officers depicted in the scene identified at left and right in the lower margin. 

Starting Price: $400
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Internet Bidding

11

Famous Maryland Patriot Family Ca 1830 Manuscript Recipe Book, Identified to Ann Cadwalader Ringgold Schley

Early 1830s manuscript cookbook entitled “Receipt Book of Mrs. Schley” (Ann Cadwalader Ringgold Schley (1801-70)). Mrs. Schley was the wife of Maryland State Senator William Schley (1799-1872) who fought a duel with US Congressman William Cost Johnson in 1837. Her father was General Samuel Ringgold (1770-1829) a US Congressman and Maryland Militia General. Her maternal grandfather was Reverend War General John Cadwalader (1742-86) a supporter of General Washington who shot General Thomas Conway in the mouth during a duel in retaliation for Conway’s participation in the "Conway Cabal” -- The attempt by Officers to remove Washington as C-I-C of the Continental Army. Her brother was Major Samuel Ringgold (1796-1846) Mexican War Hero (aka "Father of Modern Artillery") reputed to be the first US Officer to fall in the Mexican War. Her brother’s name is cited in a verse of “Maryland, My Maryland” the state song of Maryland.

The bound manuscript, approx. 80pp (40 leaves), contains 90 recipes Mrs. Schley accumulated in the early 1830s (one recipe is dated 1834, thus dating the manuscript). Presumably, most entries are in her own hand (she confuses the name recipe for receipt), but she also includes recipes from friends and relatives (attributing the source of the recipe). The handwriting differs in some places, so it may be she asked the person submitting a recipe to write it down for her. One page contains three clipped signatures of her husband, William Schley.

Included among the recipes are some unusual delights, including one entitled “Calves Head Soup.” (… after the head is well cleaned, groom the hair & put it into a large stew pan cover it with water… let them set until the head is quite tender then take out the head, put it on a dish and separate everything form the bone which is to be cut into small pieces…. Strain water… put the meat in… flour…butter…brown sugar…).

The titles of the remaining recipes are: “Force Meat Balls for Soup” “Shin of Beef Soup” “Okra Soup” “Pickling Beef” “Stewed Beef” “Pickled Cauliflower” “To Salt Tongues on Beef that you intend to Dress” “To Make Sausages” “Hand Soap” “Directions for Pickling Beef” “Pickled Tomatoes” “Irish Beef” “Tomato Sauce” “Yellow Pickles” “To Pickle Mushrooms” “To Pickle Oysters Mrs. Lyman’s Way” “Saratoga Bread” “Sugar Vinegar” “Black Cake” “Black Cake from Philadelphia” “Jumbels” “Drop Jumbles” “Genifer Cake” “Macaroon Cakes” “Rice Cakes” “Smet Breat” “Dough Nuts” “Mrs. G’s Famous Buns” “Rusk” “Buns Another Way” “Dough Nuts again” “Ginger Nuts” “Loaf Gingerbread” “My Grandmother’s Receipt For Gingerbread” [pencil note saying the grandmother was Anne Galloway (Mrs. Thomas Ringgold) as Mrs. Schley’s other grandmother (i.e., Elizabeth Lloyd Cadwalader) died in 1776 when her mother (i.e., Maria Cadwalader Ringgold) was born]; “Bread Cake” “Almond Cake” “Pound Cake” “Waffles” “Dried Peaches” “Muffin Bread” “Calves Feet Jelly” “Biscuit Bread” “Ginger Bread” “Rusk (Rurk?” “Cucumber Catsup” “Log Cabin Cake” “Waffles, Extra Fine” “Blanc Mange” “Mint Sauce” “La Grove Croquettes [Mrs. Hoffman thinks the croquettes are better made of sweetbread & tongue with a little chicken]” “Lemon Cheese Cakes” “Plumb Pudding” “Mrs. Johns Recipe for Paste” “Almond Custard” “Apple Fritters” “Sweet Meat Pudding” “Lemon Sea Cream” “Lemon Pudding” “Pancakes of Rice” “Mince Pies” “Gooseberry Pudding” “Brandy Peaches” “Snow Balls” “Sea Cream” “Rice Cups” “Puffers” “Papp [this recipe is dated June 4, 1834]” “Bavarian Cream” “Orange Jelly” “Almond Cream” “Blanc Mange” “Lady’s Cake” “Sally Lunn Bread” “Loaf Bread” “Composition Cakes” “Almond Cakes” “Soft Gingerbread” “Buckwheat Cakes” “Pink Cake” ”Sweet Biscuit” “Brown Sugar Sauce” “Corn Pudding” “Blackberry Pudding” “Oil Mangoes” “Vinegar” “Yellow Pickle” “Water Melon Rind” “Apple Jelly” “Black Cake for Summer” “To Clean Woolen Clothes”

The names (contributors) to some of the recipes include: Mrs. Hammond, Dr. William Hammond, Mrs. Eichelberger, Mrs Matthew Carroll, Mrs. E. Potts, Mrs. Hughes, E.M.A., Mrs. F.A. Schley, Mrs. Jenkins Lancaster (Lanchester?), Mrs. D. Lynn, Mrs. R.A. Taylor, E. Ringgold, A.E. (or C.) Schley, Mrs. Samuel Hoffman, Mrs. Stanley, Cornelia Potts, and Mrs. Woodville.

Starting Price: $150
Estimate: $300 - $500
Internet Bidding

12

The Mexican War and Texas, April 1836 Broadside Addressing Stay of Execution for Texan Prisoners

Decree of the Congreso general, substituting perpetual banishment for the death penalty in the case of certain Texan prisoners of war, but not members of the government and leaders in the revolution. Bando form, 11.5 x 16.5 in., with lower left margin in-cut, with heading "El C. Jose Gomez de la Cortina, Coronel del batallion del Comercia y Gobernador del Distrito," Mexico City, April 18, 1836. [see Streeter, 876]

Streeter located only his copy, which was a 4-page folded pamphlet, but not the bando form. He notes: "This decree was passed in the flush of the victory at the Alamo, applied to those rebellious Texans who surrendered within fifteen days or such greater or lesser time as Santa Anna might fix, and gave Santa Anna the right to fix the times and places of embarkation of those banished. Those not already subject to the death penalty might be punished by ten years imprisonment in interior regions of the Mexican republic, distant at least 70 leagues from the coast and the land frontiers."

Streeter, Thomas W. (1883-1965). Bibliography of Texas, 1795-1845. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1955-1960. Part 2.

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

13

Battle and Fall of the Alamo Reported in Massachusetts Newspaper

Lowell Journal and Weekly Bulletin. Lowell, MA: S. Kinnicutt, April 20, 1836. Vol. XI. No. 8. 4pp, 15.25 x 21.5 in. The issue contains inside page headlines and a lengthy detailed "first report" and complete account of the Battle and Fall of the Alamo, which occurred from February 23-March 6, 1836, during the Texas War of Independence. 

Starting Price: $400
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Internet Bidding

14

Rare Early First Regiment New England Cavalry Broadside

Printed broadside, 26 x 40 in. To Horse! First Regiment New England Cavalry! N.d. ca 1861. Broadside features large, bold title with text underneath that reads, "Gov. Sprague of R. I. having been authorized by the War Department to raise a Regiment of Picked Men, to be called the First New England Cavalry, To be drawn by quota from the several New England States, Gov. Berry of New Hampshire has authorized the subscribers to enlist the first Company from this State, which is to be the First Company of said Regiment." Broadside boasts that "Horses of Uniform Color, High Mettle and Bottom" will be provided by the State. Interestingly, certain standards are listed for potential recruits including, "The men must be temperate, trusty and reliable, five feet six inches to six feet four inches in height and from 135 to 165 pounds weight, and to be bold and fearless riders." Broadside specifically advertises a need for "2 Buglers, 2 Farriers and Blacksmiths, 1 Saddler, and 1 Waggoner" in the First Company. Text at bottom directs those interested in enlisting or gathering more information to "Nos. 1 & 2 Masonic Temple." Broadside undersigned in print, "D.B. Nelson," and  "John L. Thompson, Manchester, N.H., Oct. 1, 1861."

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

15

Civil War Recruitment Broadside from New Hampshire, Praising H.H. Pearson

Printed broadside, 16 x 22 in. Soldiers! N.d., ca 1861. Broadside announces, "H.H. Pearson, Lately of the Massachusetts 6th Regiment, having been authorized by the Adjutant General of N.H. to raise a Company of Infantry, will visit / to consult with and try to induce all those who wish to volunteer, to do so in his Company." Broadside text continues, informing readers that Pearson "intends to drill his Company in the most thorough manner as Heavy and Light Infantry as skirmishers by the sound of the Bugle and in Gen. McLellan's bayonet exercise." Compensation listed includes, "$2 per week...to volunteers for board, until they are ordered into camp," and "$12 bounty...to each, when mustered into the U. S. Service." Broadside provides information about Pearson, including details of his service and assurances of his character, endorsed and undersigned in print by "Amos Tuck" "J.W. Odlin," "Charles H. Bell," "James M. Lovering," W.B. Morill," "A. Wood," and "M.N. Collins." Pearson's reputation is further upheld by a statement touting his "unusual knowledge, industry and fidelity," undersigned in print by "Thos. J. Whipple, col. 4th N. H. Reg."

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

16

Salem Flying Artillery, Massachusetts Civil War Recruitment Broadside

Printed broadside, 18 x 24.25 in. (sight), framed, 22 x 28.25 in. Salem Flying Artillery! Salem, MA: September, ca 1861. Early Civil War broadside calling for the raising of a company for a "Battery of Artillery from Essex County...Young, Able Bodied Men of Essex, The Call is made on You! It is the Only Opportunity You Will Have To join this most desirable Department of the Service in a County Company!" Those interested in enlisting are directed to find officers with enlistment papers at the Town Hall in Salem. No further information has been uncovered regarding this Massachusetts artillery unit. 

Starting Price: $300
Estimate: $600 - $800
Internet Bidding

17

Connecticut 1st Cavalry Prepare to Mount! Broadside

Printed broadside, 17.25 x 22.75 in. Prepare to Mount! Bridgeport: Standard Job Printing Office, n.d. ca 1860s. Broadside features an illustration of an eagle centered at top. Text below title informs readers that former Captain L.N. Middlebrook has opened a "Volunteer Recruiting Office and Soldiers' Resort! for the Town of Bridgeport and Vicinity, at No. 4 Sturdevant Place," in order to provide information, advice, and services to those wishing to enlist in the 1st Connecticut Cavalry. Broadside ends by urging, "Young Men of Bridgeport! Before the Draft overtakes you, drop in and find out all about this matter of Enlisting, Bounty, &c., and hear your old friends and companions relate their experiences in the field, fighting Lee, Longstreet, Old Stonewall, Ashby, Stuart, &c., under the gallant Rosecrans, Fremont, Pope, Sigel, &c." Undersigned in print, "L.N. Middlebrook, Ex-Captain First Squadron 1st Connecticut Cavalry."

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

18

Modern Democratic Creed! Broadside Issued by John Brodhead

Printed broadside, 11.75 x 18.75 in. The Modern Democratic Creed! N.d., ca 1863. Broadside presents a "Letter of John Brodhead, Democratic Candidate for City Treasurer," from "Philadelphia, March 7th, 1860." Text of the letter reads, "Mr. Jefferson Davis. My Dear Sir:---Can you tell me if General Larman is likely to remain much longer in Nicaragua? / I should like to go to that country and help open it to the civilization and Niggers. / I could get strong recommendations from the President's present friends in Pennsylvania for the place, were the Mission vacant, and I think I would prove a live Minister. / I am tired of being a white slave at the North, and long for a home in the sunny South. / Please let me hear from you when you have leisure. / Mrs. Brodhead joins me in sending kind remembrances to Mrs. Davis and yourself. / Sincerely and gratefully your friend, / John Brodhead."

John Brodhead was the Democratic candidate in the 1863 election for Philadelphia City Treasurer, running against Republican Henry Bumm. This broadside is a remarkable example of Republican propaganda, as the pro-Southern and racist overtones presented in the purported letter would have reflected unfavorably upon Brodhead in a northern election. 

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

19

Confederate Broadside, The Reasons Why McClellan Did Not Capture Richmond

Printed broadside, 4.75 x 7 in., mounted to 9.5 x 7.25 in. The Reasons Why McClellan Did Not Capture Richmond. London Times, n.d., ca 1861-1865. Broadside text printed on green paper with ornamental border. Below title, text reads, "First—He had two / 'Hills' / To pass. / Second—A / 'Stonewall' / To mount. / Third—A / 'Longstreet' / To march through. / And seeing the impossibility of attempting such a capture, he wisely concluded to / 'Skedaddle.'" Broadside is mounted on a period printed cartoon that apparently mocks the Union Army's retreat following the First Battle of Bull Run. The cartoon features the 12th Regiment of New York at center.

Starting Price: $250
Estimate: $500 - $700
Internet Bidding

20

Maryland Confederate 1861 Broadside Issued by CSA General Bradley T. Johnson, To the People of Frederick County

Printed broadside, 7.25 x 6.5 in., To the People of Frederick County. N.d., ca 1861. Broadside features "London" seal embossed at upper right corner. Text below title warns Maryland citizens of the impending Civil War, explaining that the only way forward is to "act promptly, decidedly, resolutely." The broadside then insists that the people of Maryland vote to "determine their future course and position..." Readers are persuaded against taking up arms against the southern states, as broadside proclaims, "the honor, the pledges, the welfare, the interests, the feeling of the People of Maryland are Southern, and with Virginia and the South." It continues by asserting, "We are Determined to oppose all efforts, by whomsoever made, to separate us from her and them." The Maryland residents "who agree with us" are then invited to Frederick City on January 16, 1861 for a chance to determine the next steps for the state regarding the approaching war. 

Ink inscription at bottom of broadside reads, "Signed by [indecipherable] — J.M. Kilgour — E. Louis Lowe — [indecipherable] A. Lynch — Bradley T. Johnson, and others  " Inscription is in one hand, possibly of Confederate States Army General Bradley Tyler Johnson.

Bradley Tyler Johnson (1829-1903) was involved in both the political and military aspects of the Civil War, serving as a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Baltimore in 1860 where he and many from his delegation pulled out of the convention and joined with the southern wing of their party, supporting John C. Breckinridge and Joseph Lane as nominees for President and Vice President. Once the war broke out, Johnson contributed to the forming of the 1st Maryland Infantry CSA, and served as a major and, later, a colonel within that regiment. He was involved in the notable May 1862 Battle of Front Royal, in which the 1st Maryland regiments from both Union and Confederate Armies fought against each other. It was prior to this battle that Johnson heroically rallied his men, many of whom were discontented over delayed discharges, with a powerful speech invoking honor, loyalty, and the glory of Maryland. Johnson and the 1st Maryland also fought at the First Battle of Winchester and the Battle of Cross Keys. Johnson himself was at the Seven Days Battles, part of the Peninsula Campaign, numerous major battles near Richmond between June and July of 1862, and was eventually promoted to brigadier general of cavalry on June 28, 1864. 

Starting Price: $1,000
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Internet Bidding

21

Confederate 1863 Broadside, To the Men of Albemarle

Printed broadside, 8.25 x 4.75 in, mounted to 12 x 8.75 in. To the Men of Albemarle. Charlottesville, June 28, 1863. Undersigned in print, "John B. Minor, / E.R. Watson, / S.W. Ficklin, / Eugene Davis."

This Secretary of War has telegraphed 'to collect the local Companies formed, and being organized in Albemarle, and send them to Gordonsville to aid in guarding that point against a possible raid.' Thus whilst the organization of Minute Men is incomplete, and unaccepted, we are ivnited [sic] to render a service within the Letter of the offer we have made. Every True man, therefore, capable of a few day's service, will volunteer for the occasion in the spirit of that offer. / 'Minute Men' whether belonging to organized Companies, or not, and all others, are requested to report at Gordonsuille [sic], either by Companies or singly, with the least possible delay. Horses are undesirable. Transportation will be furnished from the nearest point of the Rail road. Ammunition and guns will be supplied, and all having arms will bring them.

Gordonsville, VA was a vitally important town during the Civil War due to its close proximity to the Virginia Central Railroad. The Confederates heavily relied upon Gordonsville and the surrounding rail lines for troop mobility and the transfer of supplies. Though Gordonsville was threatened numerous times with raids and attacks, the town emerged from the Civil War largely intact due to the effective protection of Confederate troops. Perhaps the most notable of these threats was a raid led by Major General Philip Sheridan toward Gordonsville and nearby Charlottesville, which was successfully halted by Wade Hampton's Confederate cavalry near Trevilian Station. 

Starting Price: $1,000
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Internet Bidding

22

CSA Tactic Book: Attack and Defence of Permanent Works, Twice Inscribed by South Carolina Captain

Mahan, D.H. Summary of the Course of Permanent Fortification and the Attack and Defence of Permanent Works, For the Use of the Cadets of the US Military Academy. Charleston: Steam-Power Presses of Evans & Cogswell, 1862. 8vo, paper-covered boards, 352pp. Free front end paper and title page inscribed by "Capt. C.[harles] E. Chichester Comd'g. Battery Wagner, Morris Island, SC, Feb. 14 1863." HDS lists "C.E. Chichester" of South Carolina twice, indicating that he enlisted as a captain and served with Co. C of SC Gilchrist's Heavy Artillery, as well as SC 1st Orr's Rifles Infantry.

Starting Price: $500
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Internet Bidding

23

1862 Manual Pension Bounty and Bounty Land Laws Owned by William Hughes

A Manual of Pension Bounty and Bounty Land Laws. Washington (DC): Government Printing Office, W.H. & O.H. Morrison, 1862. 9.25 in. x 6 in, dark green hard cover, 216pp plus additional pamphlets sewn in. With loose sheets in front, including a flyer for "L. Brown & Co., Collectors of Military Claims"; "Additional Instructions for preparing claims of Parents or additional Bounty under Act of July 28, 1866"; and preparing claims of surviving soldiers under the same act.

Accompanied by sewn-in pamphlet, Instructions and Forms to be observed in Applying for Army Pensions Under the Act of July 14, 1862. Second Edition. Washington (DC): GPO, 1863.

The volume gives examples of forms and what is necessary to prove that one qualifies for these pensions.

__________________________________________________________________

When one goes to the July 14, 1862 section, the introduction is interesting:

By this law several important changes in relation to pensions have been made, which must be regarded by all right-minded men as eminently wise and just. Attention is called to a few of these points.
     1. Every one conversant with our pension laws has been impressed with the great disparity in the rates of pensions between the army and navy, discriminating most unjustly against the latter. This act has placed every class and grade in the military and naval service of the United States on the same footing, and graduated the rate of each individual's pension by the same principles.
     2. This law has made the rates of pension specific and fixed in all cases, instead of contingent and moveable as the most of them were under previous laws.
     3. Under this act pensions commence on the date of discharge instead of on the completion of testimony, as under previous laws. But to secure this, application must be made within one year from the date of discharge. If this is not done the pension will commence on the date of the application.....
     5. One new principle has been introduced into this law, adopted from the English pension laws... [that is] provision for pensions to widowed mothers and orphan sisters under sixteen years of age, dependent wholly, or in part, on a deceased soldier for their support...
Much more.

Starting Price: $150
Estimate: $300 - $500
Internet Bidding

24

Rhode Island 3rd Heavy Artillery Hand Book Signed by 1st Lieutenant D.R. Irwin

Roberts, Joseph, Captain, 4th Regiment Artillery, US Army. The Hand-Book of Artillery, for the Service of the United States. New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1862. Third Edition. 24mo, fabric covers with gold crossed cannon and title on cover, 180pp. Book containing instructions on the ranges of heavy artillery, windage, ricochet and projectiles, with illustrations of different types of fuses and more. Page headed, "Preface to Second Edition," ink signed by 1st Lieutenant D.R. Irwin, Co. F, 3rd Regiment, Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, who enlisted as a 1st sergeant in August 1861 and likely obtained this hand book when he was promoted to 1st lieutenant on May 1, 1863. 

Starting Price: $200
Estimate: $400 - $600
Internet Bidding

25

Siege of Petersburg (Battle of Jerusalem Plank Road) Manuscript Map, Plus

Lot of 3, including manuscript map, 9.5 x 7.75 in., showing the position of Brigadier General Francis C. Barlow's division during the Battle of Jerusalem Plank Road on June 22, 1864. Barlow was in charge of the 3rd Division, 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac during the battle. On the morning of June 22, a gap opened up between the 2nd and 6th Corps. CSA General Mahone took advantage of this split and surprised Barlow's men at the rear, causing the division to collapse. Though the 2nd Corps troops were able to rally before Mahone's reinforcements made it to the field, the battle ended inconclusively, with Union casualties at nearly 3,000 and Confederate casualties close to 600. In a report on the operations of June 22, Barlow describes, "I moved forward, placing one brigade on the prolongation of General Mott's line, and protecting my flank by throwing back two small brigades on my left. By the movement ordered not only my flank but my rear was exposed to the enemy, who soon pressed into the gap between the Second and Sixth Corps." The map featured here depicts the enemy advances made upon Barlow's division during that critical shift in lines between the two corps, and marks a position to the right of Barlow's division where prisoners were taken, labelled, "1st Mass taken prisoner." Consignor relates that the map came from the military papers of Brevet Brigadier General John Willian. 

West, Joseph R. Partially printed DS as First Lieutenant of the 6th New Jersey Volunteers, "Jos. R. West, 1st Lt., 6th N. J. V.," 1p, 8 x 10.25 in., "Camp 6th, Regt. N.J. Vols." August 9, 1862. Army voucher lists arms and equipment supplied to then 1st Lieutenant John Willian's command, Company D, 6th New Jersey Volunteers, days before McClellan's Army of the Potomac retired to northern Virginia in order to help John Pope deal with the Confederate forces threatening Washington. Items listed include, "45 Bayonet Scabbards," "45 Cartridge Boxes," "45 Waist Belts," "45 Screw Drivers," and other equipment.

Willian, John. Autographed copy of "General Orders, No. 256," issued by the War Department, Washington, DC. September 15, 1864, listing all "Promotions and appointments in the Army of the United States, made by the President...since the publication of 'General Orders' No. 316, of September 18, 1863." Signed on first page, "John Willian, A. A. [indecipherable] Gen'l" as assistant adjutant general. Highlights include the promotions of Henry J. Hunt and George Stoneman in the Regular Army from major to lieutenant colonel (pages 11 and 6, respectively), the promotions of Generals Grant, Meade, Sherman, and Thomas to the ranks they held at the conclusion of the Civil War (pages 131-132), and future President James A. Garfield's volunteer appointment to major general (page 55).

John Willian (1835-1869), though born in Lancashire, England, rose through the Union ranks to become a brevet brigadier general during the Civil War (appointed as such April 9, 1865). He served with the 4th, 6th, 8th, and 12th New Jersey Infantry Regiments and was promoted six times between September of 1861 and April of 1865. His military career notably included service as acting assistant inspector general for Brigadier General Gersham Mott and, later, for Major General Andrew A. Humphreys.

Starting Price: $450
Estimate: $900 - $1,200
Internet Bidding

26

Atlas to Accompany the ORs of the Union and Confederate Armies

Cowles, Calvin D., Capt. Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Published Under the Direction of the Hons. Redfield Proctor, Stephen B. Elkins, and Daniel S. Lamont, Secretaries of War. By Maj. George B. Davis, US Army, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Civilian Expert, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley, Civilian Expert, Board of Publication. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1891-1895. Folio, 3/4 leather over maroon cloth, beveled boards, gilt outlines of leather, 4 spine bands, gilt lettering, marbled endpapers, brass "feet" on boards. This large volume contains the complete group of 175 maps, panoramic views, charts, illustrations, and more that were produced to accompany the Official Records of the Civil War. Also has Preface, Table of Contents, Index. Each map has a heavy paper tab with the plate number on it. An extra loose copy of Plate 46 stuck in the volume, but the original map that is bound in is in much better condition than the loose one. On ffep and tp, "Presented to Carnegie Library by Woman's Relief Corps No. 4, Auxilliary to Phil Kearney Post GAR No. 7, Yankton, SD."

Starting Price: $500
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
Internet Bidding

27

Anti-Slavery Newspaper, The Liberator, Covering Lee's Surrender to Grant and the Capture of Richmond

The Liberator. Boston, MA: Robert F. Wallcut, April 14, 1865. 4pp, 17.5 x 25 in. Anti-slavery newspaper containing inside page "stacked" headlines and a full column of detailed coverage on the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General U.S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, VA - thus marking the end of the Civil War. The issue also includes a prominent headline and full column report of the capture of the Confederate capital of Richmond to Union forces, thus precipitating the events that led to Lee's surrender just six days later. 

Very important anti-slavery newspaper founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Isaac Knapp, featuring the two most significant events marking the end of the Civil War. 

Starting Price: $300
Estimate: $600 - $800
Internet Bidding

28

Half Plate Full-length Ambrotype of an Armed Union Soldier

Half plate ambrotype housed in a pressed paper case, showing a full-length view of a Union soldier standing with his musket at his side and wearing a US belt buckle and cartridge box.

Starting Price: $375
Estimate: $750 - $1,000
Internet Bidding

29

Half Plate Ambrotype of Private Adumea Russell, 6th Michigan Cavalry, Captured at Hanover, PA

Half plate ambrotype of a mustached soldier in uniform, wearing a forage cap and nine-button coat, housed in half case. Accompanied by 20th century photographic sleeve identifying the subject as "Adumea Russell, Company L, 6th Michigan Cavalry / Was in Battle at Hanover, Penn. and Captured. Shot in Virginia." HDS lists Russell as a Richland, MI resident who enlisted as a private at the age of 27 and mustered into Co. L, 6th MI Cavalry on 10/62, and notes that he was missing on 6/30/65 at Hanover, PA, but no additional details relative to his capture or possible wounds suffered at Virginia are included. Russell was transferred on 1/65 to Co. I, Veteran Reserve Corps, and discharged 6/29/65 at Washington, DC. 

Despite condition, a fine portrait of a Michigan trooper that served with General George A. Custer's celebrated Michigan Cavalry Brigade, which participated in a number of significant battles and skirmishes throughout the war, including Hanover, Hunterstown, and Gettysburg.

Starting Price: $300
Estimate: $600 - $800
Internet Bidding

30

Half Plate Tintype of Three Western Cavalrymen in the Field

Half plate outdoor tintype of three mounted cavalrymen, likely mid-to-late in the war, in the Western Theater. Two of the soldiers wear sack coats and one, interestingly, sports a shell jacket with shoulder scales. Housed under mat, glass, and preserver, but uncased.

Starting Price: $500
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Internet Bidding
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