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1

Harriet Tubman Cabinet Card by H.S. Squyer, Auburn, New York

Cabinet card of Harriet Tubman. Horatio Seymour Squyer (1848-1905): Auburn, New York, 1892. Embossed imprint on recto. Inscription on verso, “Harriet Tubman / Slavery Heroine.”

Harriet Tubman (ca 1822-1913) was born into slavery as Araminta Ross on a plantation in Dorchester County, Maryland. She escaped slavery in 1849, fleeing to Philadelphia and becoming a leading abolitionist and member of the Underground Railroad. She went on to lead at least thirteen expeditions to rescue over seventy enslaved people, notably having “never lost a passenger,” earning her many nicknames, among them “Moses,” “Old Chariot,” and “The General.” Tubman saw the victory of the Union during the Civil War as essential for the abolition of slavery. She worked tirelessly as a nurse, scout, spy, and led an assault on plantations in the Combahee River Raid rescuing more than 750 slaves in the process.

After the war, she chose to live outside of the public spotlight in upstate New York. Tubman had purchased property from abolitionist senator William H. Seward in 1859 and retired there after Appomattox and remained there for the rest of her life. It also seems that she was not fond of being photographed. In spite of her fame, few known studio portraits of her to exist. This image is especially notable: it is the largest and most detailed depiction of her intense gaze. It is nearly twice the size of the cartes de visite. The other known cabinet card is a full-length portrait, this one, focusing on Tubman’s face, gives a rare look at her features. The scar on her forehead, received when a raging slave owner threw a heavy metal weight, is visible on her brow. Stoic and robust, this portrait shows Harriet, the veteran general, the American hero. The only other known copy of this photograph is housed in the collections of Cayuga Museum of History and Art in Auburn, New York - Tubman’s hometown and where the photograph was originally taken in the studio of Horatio Seymour Squyer.

Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$51,250
02/20/2020

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2

Unpublished CDV of Frederick Douglass by Benjamin F. Smith, 1864

CDV portrait of Frederick Douglass. B.F. Smith & Son: Portland, Maine, n.d., ca 1864. Photographer's 91 Middle Street imprint on verso. In this previously unpublished image of Douglass, he is featured sitting next to a table and wearing a long black coat. Light pencil identification on verso. 

This photograph was likely captured in January or February of 1864 during the same sitting as another known Benjamin F. Smith photograph cataloged in Picturing Frederick Douglass as Plate 21 and curated by Cornell University, Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. 

Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$12,500
02/20/2020

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3

Frederick Douglass CDV by Samuel M. Fassett, 1878

CDV portrait of Frederick Douglass. Samuel M. Fassett: Washington DC, n.d., ca 1878. Photographer's 925 Penna Ave. imprint on verso. Douglass is pictured with heavily graying/white hair, wearing a dark jacket and waistcoat and what appears to be a watch chain. Pencil identification on recto: "Fred Douglas [sic]." Catalogued in Picturing Frederick Douglas as Cat. #95. The only other known example of this carte is catalogued by the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University. 

A previously unknown carte appearing to be from the same sitting was recently offered in Swann Auction Galleries's March 28, 2019 Printed & Manuscript African Americana Auction as Lot 236.

Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$10,000
02/20/2020

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4

Frederick Douglass Walking Stick, 1888

Ebonized wood walking cane with gold-filled cap and brass ferrule presented to Frederick Douglass. Cap engraved: "Hon. F. Douglass / From D.L.I. / Charleston S.C. / Mar. 6th / 1888." Repousse design of three wild strawberries with distinctive leaves and five-petaled flower against a hammered background. Stamped to collar "R.F.S. & Co.," hallmark of Robert Fitz Simmons of Attleboro, Massachusetts. Length: 34.5 in. Cap circumference.: 3.5 in. 

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was the most famous African American abolitionist and orator of the 19th century. During the last decade of his life, he traveled frequently to give speeches all across the country. In early 1888, Douglass embarked on a speaking tour of South Carolina and Georgia, a journey not without peril. In early March 1888, Douglass arrived in Charleston, South Carolina where he delivered versions of his "Self-Made Men" and "European Travels" addresses at Mount Zion church, founded in 1883 and considered a "daughter church" of Mother Emanuel AME, the oldest African Methodist Episcopal church in the southern United States. He was honored afterward by an African American militia unit calling themselves the Douglass Light Infantry. According to a contemporaneous newspaper account, the infantry members serenaded him at their armory. They also presented him with this walking stick, decorated on the collar with strawberries, symbolizing righteousness and spiritual merit in Christian art. 

Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$37,500
02/20/2020

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5

Frederick Douglass Autobiography My Bondage, My Freedom, 1855

DOUGLASS, Frederick (ca 1818-1895). My Bondage, My Freedom. Part I. - Life as a Slave. Part II. - Life as a Freeman. New York: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1855.

12mo (140 x 196 mm). Tissue guarded frontispiece with facsimile signature and 2 engraved plates. (Small bookseller label to interior front board). Contemporary brown cloth with blindstamped boards and gilt spine titles (Some wear to extremities, spine shaken and slightly cocked, scuffs).

FIRST EDITION, LATER PRINTING. “Fifteenth Thousand” printed at top of title page. Important second autobiography and slave narrative of one of the most significant Americans of the 19th century. Sabin 20714.

Estimate: $600 - $800
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,125
02/20/2020

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6

William W. Brown Slave Narrative, 1849

BROWN, William W. (ca 1814-1884). Narrative of William W. Brown, A Fugitive Slave. Boston: Bela Marsh, 1849.

12mo (119 x 186 mm). Tissue-guarded frontispiece and three engravings. (Spotting, repaired corner on frontispiece). Original embossed brown cloth (wear to corners and edges, slightly cocked spine).

“Complete Edition, Tenth Thousand,” attributed as fourth edition. Slave narrative of prominent abolitionist and prolific author William Wells Brown. His later novel Clotel (1853) is considered the first novel written by an African American and he also became the first published African American playwright (1856). Scarce, OCLC locates 5 copies.

Estimate: $100 - $200
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,500
02/20/2020

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7

Exploration of Post-War Southern Race Relations, My Southern Home by William Wells Brown

BROWN, William Wells (ca 1814-1884). My Southern Home: Or, The South and Its People. Boston: A.G. Brown & Co., 1880.

12mo (137 x 297 mm). Frontispiece with illustrations throughout. (Pages evenly toned, occasional brown spotting). Brown pebbled cloth with blindstamped boards and gilt spine titles (Spine and front board sunned, wear to extremities, binding slightly cocked) 

Presumed FIRST EDITION. Autobiographical exploration of relationships between southern blacks and whites before and after the Civil War. Published by A.G. Brown, the family publishing house run by his second wife, Annie G. Brown. Scarce.

Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,063
02/20/2020

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8

Scarce Slave Narrative of J. Vance Lewis, 1910 First Edition

LEWIS, J. Vance (ca 1853-1925). Out of the Ditch: A True Story of an Ex-Slave. Houston: Rein & Sons, 1910.

8vo (145 x 213 mm). Frontispiece and plates throughout. Original pictorial cloth (Very light edge wear, spine titles slightly rubbed, else near fine).

FIRST EDITION. Slave narrative of Joseph Lewis Vance who was freed through emancipation. After attending Leland University in New Orleans, Vance became a teacher in rural county east Texas in order to bolster his finances. He then attended Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) before finishing his education in Ann Arbor, Michigan, graduating in 1894 and being admitted to the Supreme Court of Michigan the same year. In 1897, he was admitted to the US Supreme Court - one of 18 lawyers accepted, he was the only African American. He practiced law in Chicago and New Orleans before returning to Texas, where he was admitted to the Texas Bar in 1904 and established a thriving practice in Houston. Notably, he became the first black lawyer to successfully defend a black client accused of murder in front of a Harris County jury. His law office at 419 1/2 Milam held the offices of other African American professionals including nine other attorneys who served Houston's African American population of about 30,000 in 1915. Quite scarce, OCLC locates 9 copies.

Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$3,750
02/20/2020

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9

Abolitionist Narrative The Branded Hand by Jonathan Walker, 1850

WALKER, Jonathan (1799-1878). [The Branded Hand] Trial and Imprisonment of Jonathan Walker, at Pensacola Florida, for Aiding Slaves to Escape from Bondage. Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1850.

12mo (121 x 189 mm). Illustrated title page and three full-page engravings, lacking frontispiece. (Occasional brown spotting on pages). Original brown cloth with blind and gilt title (very good with lightly bumped corners, slightly cocked spine).

Preceded by editions in 1845, 1846 and 1848, presumed fourth edition. Jonathan Walker was imprisoned for eleven months for having aided in the escape of seven slaves from Pensacola. As punishment, his hand was publicly branded “SS” for “slave stealer,” illustrated on the title page. Upon his release, Walker became an ardent abolitionist and lectured on slavery in addition to publishing this narrative which inspired John Greenleaf Whittier’s poem The Branded Hand. Uncommon.

Estimate: $100 - $200
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$531
02/20/2020

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10

Thaddeus Hyatt, Abolitionist, Friend of John Brown, CDV, ca 1861

Studio portrait of Thaddeus Hyatt. Brady National Portrait Gallery, Neg., E. Anthony, Pub.: New York, ca 1861.

Born in Rahway, New Jersey, Hyatt (1816-1901) became a successful New York manufacturer before the age of 40 with his invention of a translucent paving glass. During the 1850s, Hyatt became a committed abolitionist and he traveled to Kansas in 1856 as President of the National Kansas Committee, one of many groups that raised money for anti-slavery immigrants moving into the territory. His committee raised more than $100,000 for the Free-State settlers, and Hyatt was credited with providing a large group of unemployed individuals with the provisions and tools needed to found the town of Hyattville, giving them useful employment and preventing them from resorting to degrading activities. It was through his relief work in Kansas that Hyatt became acquainted with John Brown.

Following the raid on Harper's Ferry and the execution of Brown on December 2, 1859, Hyatt organized a relief fund for Brown's widow. In 1860, he again led a national campaign to aid Kansas settlers whose farms were nearly destroyed as a result of a two-year drought. Hyatt wrote several circulars in an attempt to arouse people in the Eastern United States to take an interest in the Kansas setters, and he inspired President James Buchanan to contribute $100 to the relief fund.

This photograph was probably made in January 1857, when Hyatt and the National Kansas Committee met for the first and only time in New York City. (Information obtained from the Kansas Historical Society Website, January 2, 2020.)

Estimate: $150 - $250
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$438
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

11

Boudoir Card of Owen Brown, John Brown's Son, ca 1887

Boudoir card showing Owen Brown, John Brown's son, in front of his cabin. Lamson: Pasadena, California, n.d., ca 1887. Image of a small, what appears to be one-room cabin. Owen Brown (1824-1889), with a full white beard and mustache, stands in front holding a walking stick. Three white children, possibly his nephews, are visible in the doorway and sitting on the stoop. An African American man leans upon the cabin's only window sill, holding a hat in his hand. A younger white man wearing a bowler hat stands to the far right of the image. Of all the images of Owen Brown in front of his Southern California cabin, this is the only known example to include an African American. 

Owen Brown was the third son of abolitionist John Brown, who was also devoted to the cause. Owen had moved west to Kansas in 1854 in an effort to ensure that the state would be free when it entered the Union. He would notably participate in the raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859. When he believed his father to be dead, he escaped with four others. He spent the Civil War in hiding as he had a $25,000 bounty on his head, though he remained an active conductor on the Underground Railroad, leading fugitive slaves across Ohio. In the early 1880s, he moved west and arrived in Pasadena, California, building a cabin in El Prieto Canyon near Altadena with his brother Jason and his family. Brown would be an active temperance advocate in Pasadena but would die in 1889. Over 2,000 people came to his funeral, nearly equal the entire population of Pasadena at the time, where a band leading the procession played "John Brown's Body." Owen was laid to rest near the cabin on what was called Brown Mountain, named for his father. 

Estimate: $400 - $600
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$750
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

12

J.O. Simmons, Plantation Supplies Trade Card, ca 1850-1870

J.O. Simmons, General Dealer in Plantation Supplies, printed trade/business card, ca 1850-1870. Extremely crisp and bright, very fine. Trade card for plantation supplies delivered along the Mississippi River.

Estimate: $50 - $100
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$125
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

13

California Imprint of President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation Broadside, 1864

President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. [San Francisco]: F.L. Butler, 1864. Lithograph broadside on paper. 20.5 x 26.25 (519 x 665 mm). Imprints “Executed according to Act of Congress, the year 1864 by F.S. Butler in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Northern District of California” to lower edge; “Executed and published by F.L. Butler, 1864. Aged 14 years” to lower left; and “Printed by L. Nagel” to lower right.

This San Francisco impression of President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation was printed by L. Nagel and published by F.S. Butler, declared as being “aged 14 years” in 1864. The broadside, according to Eberstadt, was “executed by a fourteen-year-old boy. Benjamin F. Butler, who was a California pioneer of 1849 and established the first lithographing plant on the West Coast, may have been the boy’s father.” F.S. Butler, however, may have been Frederick Stewart Butler (1849-1918) whose father, Miner Frederick Butler (1826-1871) was the original architect of the California State Capitol. Frederick, listed as a 21-year-old clerk in the 1870 census would have been the correct age in 1864. Very scarce, OCLC locates only 3 copies.

Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$12,500
02/20/2020

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14

Lincoln and Sojourner Truth Related Pinbacks, ca 1910-1913

Lot of 2 Lincoln-related pinbacks. 

Lincoln Benefit Society, ca 1910. Verso back paper: "Manufactured by / St. Louis Button Co / St. Louis, Mo. / Pat. Aug. 8 '99" Diam. 1 in. (25 mm). Pictures Abraham Lincoln standing over a seated Sojourner Truth. The Lincoln Benefit Society was a fraternal and insurance organization for African Americans in Wilson, North Carolina led by prominent citizen and postmaster, Samuel Vick. 

Emancipation Proclamation, 1863-1913, ca 1913Verso back paper: "The Whitehead & Hoag Co. / Buttons / Badges / Novelties / and Signs / Newark, N.J." Diam. 0.8 in. (21 mm) Text surrounds profile bust of Lincoln. Commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Estimate: $400 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$594
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

15

Mathew Brady CDV, Hiram Revels, ca 1865 with CDV, Radical Members of the So. Ca. Legislature, 1868

Lot of 2 CDVs, including portrait of Hiram Revels. 

CDV showing profile portrait of Hiram Revels seated in a studio setting. Mathew Brady: New York, New York and Washington, DC, ca 1868. 

Radical Members of the So. Ca. Legislature. J.G. Gibbes: Columbia, South Carolina, 1868. A composite image featuring portraits of the members, including both white and black subjects, identified in print on mount verso. 

Hiram Rhodes Revels (1827-1901) was born a free person of color in North Carolina before his ordination by the AME church in 1845. He was a preacher until the Civil War began and served as an army chaplain for an African American regiment. Revels settled in Mississippi in 1866 and got involved in state politics, eventually becoming the first African American United States Senator in 1870. He was known as a gifted orator and a political moderate who favored equal rights for African Americans and amnesty for the former Confederates. The known photographs of Senator Revels, such as the ones in the Brady-Handy Collection at the Library of Congress, were photographed by Mathew Brady in Washington DC during his term as senator. The photograph in this collection was also taken by Brady but on a different date. 

Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$5,625
02/20/2020

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16

"Why I Object to Freeing the Negro" ALS from Reconstruction Era Texas, 1866

ALS, 3 pp., 197 x 245 mm, Austin, Texas, August 4, 1866, Dawson to his brother William Dawson.

A fascinating letter from a white Texas homesteader to his brother in Pennsylvania. The content, while unsavory, provides a captivating insight into the racial politics of early Reconstruction Texas. Dawson writes about his own prospects, but most of the letter concerns African American Texans.

Dawson opens his letter writing about the property and house he has bought near Austin and gives his perspective on the state, “Texas now looks flourishing - good crops, good grass, everywhere plenty of water, fat stock, plenty of vegetables, peaches, watermelons, corn, etc. and a very flattering prospect for better. Still many are dissatisfied and wish to sell and leave some on account of the free negro society, others on account of the Govt.”

He continues on regarding black Texans in detail, his biases and negative stereotypes evident, “The Freedmen are doing as well as could be expected, many complain that they do not work, a few brag on them, and others resolve to have nothing more to do with them but this I think is only talk. I think myself that the greatest danger is in their not being able to bear prosperity and that this year’s cotton crop will demoralize many of them. Some of the old steady ones will save their money and do well but the majority will indulge in idle and vicious propensities.”

Austin was a hotbed of unrest in the early days of Texas Reconstruction. Federal troops occupied the state in late May 1865 in an attempt to ensure loyal government and to protect the newly granted rights to freed blacks. Many white Texans, as Dawson here, focused on the permanent disruption of labor and believed that it would destroy the entire economy. Dawson writes explicitly about his opposition to ending slavery, “But perhaps I never told you why I myself object to freeing the negro. It is this. I am getting old and have no boys + on that account expect to have to hire. While the negroes were slaves when I could hire them from their masters they would work well because they could be compelled. Now they are harder to get and not many of them worth much when you get them and as long as they are here among us no white labor will come in + when a negro was a slave he kept in a negro’s place. Now many are anxious to show their freedom by insolence [illegible] shoving themselves on an equality.”

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,625
02/20/2020

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17

Cabinet Cards Illustrations of Negro Life in Washington by Mrs. Robinson Colburn

Lot of 6 albumen cabinet cards from the series Illustrations of Negro Life in Washington reproducing drawings by Mrs. Rollinson (Helen) Colburn (1844-1912). Each with the series title, individual caption, and “copyright 1887.”  Colburn was the daughter of artist Rembrandt Lockwood and married treasury clerk Rollinson Colburn. Published a series of eight cabinet cards reproducing her sketches of African Americans in Washington, DC. 

Estimate: $500 - $700
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$625
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

18

Hedgehog's Grand Combination Anti-Black and Anti-15th Amendment Letterpress Broadside, 1870

Hedgehog’s Grand Combination of the Powers of Darkness, Will Exhibit at Jake Key’s Roost, Thursday Evening, May 5th, 1870. [Philadelphia?]: No publisher, 1870. Letterpress broadside. 6.5 x 10 in. Small tear along upper edge, otherwise very good.

An anti-Fifteenth Amendment parody broadside in the style of early minstrelsy handbills. Printed in various fonts it lists the program with racist songs and “the whole to conclude with Hedgehog’s celebrated feat of swallowing a Live Negro!” The Fifteenth Amendment was ratified on February 3, 1870, which prohibited the denial of a citizen’s right to vote based upon “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” The amendment was greeted with celebrations among African American and abolitionist communities with one of the largest held in Philadelphia on May 5, 1870, billed as the “Grand Celebration in Honor of the Ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment.” This anti-black broadside was likely printed as an attack on the official celebration.

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$250
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

19

Mathew Brady CDV of Slave Dealer, Alexandria, Virginia

CDV showing a group of Union soldiers standing with a horse and buggy at the site of a former slave pen, with sign reading, "Price, Birch & Co. / Dealers in Slaves." Mathew Brady: Washington DC, n.d., ca 1862. With Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries imprint on verso. 

James H. Birch and Charles M. Price operated the largest slave pen in Alexandria, Virginia beginning in 1858. The building's orientation within the city, midway between the urban center and farmland to the west, allowed for the efficient containment and transport of men, women, and children before and after slave auctions. However, following the invasion and capture of Alexandria by the Union Army in May 1861, the facility was converted to a military prison.

Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,625
02/20/2020

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20

African American Soldier and Medal of Honor Recipient Christian A. Fleetwood CDV with Three Additional CDVs of Civil War Soldiers

Lot of 4. 

CDV full-standing studio portrait of African American soldier Christian Abraham Fleetwood. Richard Walzl: Baltimore, Maryland, n.d., ca 1865. Fleetwood, of the 4th US Colored Infantry, dressed in uniform, with sword in hand, wearing two medals on his coat, including the Medal of Honor. Period ink identification on verso. Born free in Baltimore, Fleetwood (1840-1914) enlisted at the age of 23 as a sergeant with Co. G of the 4th US Colored Infantry in September 1863 and was quickly promoted to sergeant major. In the fall of 1864, during the Battle of Chaffin's Farm on the outskirts of the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, Fleetwood saved the colors from falling into Confederate hands, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in April 1865. He was one of only 18 African Americans who fought during the Civil War to receive this medal. 

Autographed CDV of Captain John W. Dillenback. Jas. L. Warner: New York, n.d., ca 1865. Enlisted as a private and served with Co. G, 10th New York Heavy Artillery, then Co. F, 4th US Colored Infantry, rising in the ranks from captain to brevet lieutenant colonel between 1863 and 1865. He served with the US Army until March 31, 1899. 

CDV of S Walter Reynolds, possibly autographed on verso. Whitehurst Gallery and W. Snell: Washington, DC, n.d., ca 1865. Reynolds enlisted as a 2nd lieutenant and served with Co. F and Co. H, 4th US Colored Troops, raising in the ranks to 1st lieutenant then brevet captain between 1864 and 1865; mustered out May 4, 1866. 

CDV of Warren H. Hurd. O.J. Smith: Newbern, North Carolina, n.d., ca 1865. Enlisted as a private and served with Co. A, 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, and was promoted to corporal, then commissioned as a captain with Co. A, 23rd US Colored Infantry. POW at White Oak Swamp, Virginia, June 30, 1862; mustered out November 30, 1865.

Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$33,750
02/20/2020

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21

CDVs Pvt. Jake Standerford and 1st Lieut. George W. Ackles, 108th Regiment USCT

Lot of 2, featuring soldiers from the 108th USCT.

CDV full-length portrait of African American soldier. Gayford & Speidel: Rock Island, Illinois, n.d., ca 1865. Imprint on verso. Identified on verso by ink inscription as "Jake Staniford / Prvt. Co. F. 108 USCT."  Accompanied by CDV full-length portrait of Union officer identified below image as "Geo. W. Ackles, 1st Lieut." P.B. Jones: Davenport, Iowa, n.d., ca 1863. Imprint on verso.

Organized at Louisville, Kentucky on June 20, 1864, the 108th United States Colored Infantry regiment consisted predominantly of formerly enslaved men from Kentucky as well as some free men. After garrison and guard duty at various points in Kentucky, the regiment arrived at Rock Island POW camp in Illinois. Here the 108th served guard duty over Confederate prisoners from January - May 1865 during which time these photographs were likely taken. 

Records indicate that a Jacob Standerford (inscribed on the CDV as "Staniford") enlisted on 6/27/1864 with Co. F of the 108th USCT. Though he is identified on the CDV as a private, HDS indicates Standerford attained the rank of corporal. Gayford & Speidel Photographers were active in Rock Island in the 1860s, and are known to have photographed dozens of soldiers from the USCT. A group of 30 related Gayford & Speidel images of officers, non-commissioned officers, and enlisted men from the 108th Co. F are in the collection of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. Standerford's image is not among them.

George W. Ackles enlisted on 9/20/1864 at Louisville as a 1st lieutenant and was commissioned into Co. G of the 108th Infantry. He served with USCT through 2/28/1865 at which time he was discharged for promotion. 

Estimate: $2,500 - $4,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$5,313
02/20/2020

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22

James P. Ball CDVs of Union Officers

Lot of 2 CDV portraits of Union officers taken by African American photographer James P. Ball (1825-1904). 

CDV half-portrait of an unidentified Union field-grade officer, possibly a major. Ball & Thomas: Cincinnati, Ohio, n.d., ca 1860. He is pictured with a full beard and wearing his double-breasted uniform coat. 120 W. 4th St. imprint and 3 cent stamp on verso. 

CDV full portrait of an unidentified Union junior officer. J.P. Ball: Cincinnati, Ohio, n.d., 1862-1868. With white hair and full beard, the officer stands with his hand resting on a column plinth wearing his long single-breasted uniform coat. Embossed 30 W. 4th St. imprint on recto below image. 

James Presley Ball is one of the most renowned African American photographers at one point owning the largest photographic gallery west of the Appalachians. When visiting White Sulphur Springs, Virginia in 1845 he met John B. Bailey, an African American daguerreotypist from Boston where he acquired the passion and skill of photography. He opened a studio in Cincinnati later that year, and though it was unsuccessful, he continued his art with studios in Pittsburgh and Richmond and traveled as an itinerant daguerreotypist. In 1849, he reopened a studio in Cincinnati. He hired his younger brother Thomas Ball to work as an operator, and in 1852 hired his future brother-in-law Alexander Thomas to work with him. By 1857, their gallery was one of the grandest in the United States attracting notables including Frederick Douglass. He was chosen in 1887 as the official photographer of a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation held in Minneapolis-St.Paul. In 1888, he moved to Helena, Montana with his son where he operated a studio for several years before moving again in 1892 to Seattle. 

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$375
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

23

Sutler's Pets, 41st Illinois CDV, ca 1864

CDV featuring a young African American male holding a puppy while sitting in a chair with a chicken perched on the top rail, ca 1864. Ink inscription on recto: "Sutlers Pets / 41st Illinois." Blue border on recto and verso.

The role of sutler was often filled by a civilian businessman who typically identified himself with a particular regiment, providing goods and camp fare, including items that were not readily available to the soldiers, and accompanying the regiment from camp to camp. His wares could range from writing materials to ID disks, and from clothing items to desirable foodstuffs the army did not provide. The sutler of the 41st Illinois Volunteer Infantry was Joel C. Benton, who likely commissioned this image to advertise some of his fare, including fresh food in the form of a chicken, and companionship in the form of a puppy. The African American subject pictured was likely a runaway slave and helper to Benton, and was perhaps viewed by Benton as a "pet" himself. 

The 41st Illinois Infantry Regiment, organized at Decatur, saw action at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Hatchie's Bridge, Vicksburg, and Meridian before consolidating with the 53rd Regiment in December of 1864.

Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,875
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

24

First Full-Length Biography by African American, Life of Martin Delany

ROLLIN, Frank A. (Frances Anne Rollin Whipper, ca 1845-1901). Life and Public Services of Martin R. Delany, Sub-Assistant Commissioner Bureau Relief of Refugees, Freedmen, and of Abandoned Lands and Late Major 104th Colored Troops. Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1868.

8vo (134 x 197 mm). Publisher’s green cloth with gilt shield and title to spine (minor scuffing to boards and spine, lightly bumped lower corner, near fine).

FIRST EDITION. Martin Robison Delany (1812-1885) was one of the first black men admitted to Harvard Medical School and led a distinguished medical career in addition to his journalistic pursuits and interest in foreign colonization for African Americans. During the Civil War, he served as a surgeon in the famed 54th Massachusetts Volunteers and also aided in recruitment efforts. In February 1865, he became the first black man to receive a regular army commission when promoted to major in the 104th US Colored Troops.

Frances Anne Rollin Whipper was a free woman of color who was educated at the The Quaker School for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. When she was illegally refused first class passage on a ferry in 1865, she sued the captain and was aided by Delany, then working in the Freedmen’s Bureau. Delany, impressed by Frances, asked her to write his biography. When published in 1868, it was the first full-length biography written by an African-American. Very scarce.

Estimate: $500 - $1,000
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,000
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

25

Black Military History The Black Phalanx First Edition

WILSON, Joseph T. (1837-1890). The Black Phalanx; A History of the Negro Soldiers of the United States in the Wars of 1775-1812, 1861-’65. Springfield, Massachusetts: Winter & Co.; Hartford: American Publishing Company, 1888 (copyright 1887).

8vo (152 x 228 mm). Publisher's maroon cloth with blindstamp and gilt illustrations. (Previous ownership to front free endpaper dated “March 10th, 1888.” Toned spine with some rubbing to caps. A fine copy).

FIRST EDITION. Wilson served in the Civil War, originally enlisting as a private with the 2nd Louisiana Native Guard later reorganized as the 74th United States Colored Troops. After being discharged for illness, he later reenlisted in Co. C of the famed Massachusetts 54th Infantry composed of African American enlisted men. He was wounded in action at the Battle of Olustee (Florida) and honorably discharged in May 1864. He played a major role in the post-war politics of Virginia as a radical and prominent voice within the Republican party. He wrote extensively as the editor of the True Southerner Unionist newspaper in Norfolk, Virginia and elsewhere, often using the pseudonym “Eskiam.” Additionally, he earned the position of aide-de-camp to the commander in chief in the Grand Army of the Republic and was commissioned by its members to write The Black Phalanx. American Publishing Company publicized it widely and it was met with popular and critical acclaim.

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$438
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

26

Buffalo Soldier Charles E. Taylor ALS, Fort D.A. Russell, Cheyenne, Wyoming, 1911

ALS, 2pp, 124 x 198 mm, Fort D.A. Russell, Cheyenne, Wyoming, August 30, 1911, C.E. Taylor of Troop F, 9th US Cavalry to a Miss Harrold.

A touching letter from C.E. Taylor, an African American Buffalo Soldier serving in Company F of the famed 9th US Cavalry. It is unclear who the recipient of the letter is as Taylor opens, “I know you will be surprised to hear from a stranger.” His letter is occupied with concern over how his letter will be received but emphasizes his isolation, “please don’t think that I am writing to you for the purpose of hurting your feeling, for I am not, I am writing because I have no one to write to.” 

Charles E. Taylor was an enlisted private in Company F of the 9th Cavalry and was stationed at Fort D.A. Russell (now Francis E. Warren AFB) outside Cheyenne, Wyoming in 1911 and 1912, possibly longer. The 9th Cavalry first arrived at Fort Russell in 1909 and was sent the next year to the Mexican border to fortify the military installations due to the growing instabilities stemming from the Mexican Revolution. The 9th returned to Forth Russell after a few months but would return to the border in September 1912 to engage further in the Mexican Border War. This poignant letter was written during the brief respite Private Taylor and the others of the 9th enjoyed before returning to the border. 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$625
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

27

Quarter Plate Tintype of Buffalo Soldier Holding a Cigar, ca 1874

Quarter plate tintype full-length studio portrait of an unidentified Buffalo Soldier. Photographer and locale unknown, n.d., ca 1874. The young soldier wears an 1874 fatigue blouse, worn by the Buffalo Soldiers during the Late Indian Wars, the buttons enhanced with gold by a skilled hand. One hand rests upon the back of a chair and the other holds a smoldering cigar. 

Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,375
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

28

Sixth Plate Tintype of Seated Buffalo Soldier Marksman, ca 1886

Sixth plate tintype studio portrait of an unidentified Buffalo Soldier. Unknown photographer and locale, n.d., ca 1886. The soldier looks at the camera with an intense gaze and is seated in his uniform with marksman's pins visible on his collar. He holds a piece of paper in his hand that appears to have bullet holes - perhaps a target used as evidence of his sharpshooting. His uniform indicates that he was a sergeant during the Late Indian Wars. 

Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,125
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

29

24th Infantry Buffalo Soldiers Muster Roll, 1875

Partly printed Muster Roll of Company H of the 24th Infantry Regiment from December 31, 1874 to February 28, 1875 while stationed at Fort Brown, Texas. 811 x 520 mm.

Completed and signed on February 28, 1875 by the Captain of the Company, John C. Gilmore (1837-1901) a Civil War veteran who earned the Medal of Honor at the Battle of Salem Heights on May 3, 1863. He commanded the company of 26 enlisted men recorded as “been doing ordinary garrison and escort duty at Fort Brown, Texas during the months of January and February 1875,” also noting that “Four (4) Privates of the Company were absent on detached service as escort to Major J.W. Nicholls.” Includes a complete list of the company with the notes filled out quite fully. Most enlisted at Fort Quitman, Texas and Baltimore, Maryland. A rare primary document recording the service of the Buffalo Soldiers during the late Indian Wars.

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,750
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding

30

24th Regiment Infantryman Buffalo Soldier CDV, ca 1886

CDV half-portrait of unidentified Buffalo Soldier with the 24th Infantry. Mosser & Snell: Cantonment, Indian Territory, n.d., ca 1886. Imprint on verso: “Mosser & Snell, / Traveling / Photographic Art Gallery, / Cantonment, Ind. Terr. / Pictures copied and enlarged to any size." The mustachioed soldier wears his military-issued jacket with a high, white collar. Cantonment was used as a base of operations from 1879 to 1882 for the US government to police the Southern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, as members of the Northern Cheyenne had escaped from the reservation in 1878 in an attempt to return home. Part of the 24th Infantry of Buffalo Soldiers were stationed there beginning in the autumn of 1888.

Estimate: $600 - $800
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$531
02/20/2020

Internet Bidding
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