November 13, 2020 12:00 PM EST Cincinnati
Ends November 23, 2020


Items 1-31 of 304
Results per page:

1

Group of Five Early English Newspapers, Including The Oxford Gazette Second Issue Dated November 20, 1665

Lot of 5 mid-17th and early 18th century English newspapers, including a very rare 2nd issue of England's first real newspaper The Oxford Gazette comprising: 

LITCHFIELD, Leonard (1604-1657). The Oxford Gazette. Re-printed at London by Thomas Newcomb. Nov. 16-20, 1665. [Second Issue]. (Vertical crease, small chip with neat repair on right edge). Started by Henry Muddiman with it's first issue published on 7 November 1665. It was during this period that King Charles II had moved the Royal Court to Oxford to attempt to escape the Great Plague of London. Notable that Samuel Pepys noted the first issue in his diary. Issues #1-23 were published in Oxford, with most simultaneously printed in London as well, as seen here. When the King and Court returned to London, the Gazette moved as well, with the first London issue (labeled No. 24) issued on Feb. 5, 1666. The London Gazette, still published, claims to be the oldest continuously published newspaper. 

NEWCOMB, Thomas. The London Gazette. January 28-31, 1666. Numb. 126. 2pp. 7 x 11.25 in. 

NEWCOMB, Thomas. The London Gazette. April 8-11, 1672. Numb. 667. 2pp. 6.5 x 10.75 in. 

TOOKE, Benjamin. The London Gazette. March 11-13, 1711. Numb. 4977. 2pp. 6.5 x 11.5 in. 

MORPHEW, John (d.1720). The Post Boy. Sept. 13-15, 1716. Numb 4233. 2pp. 8.25 x 13.75 in. Illustrated masthead. (Toned, tape repair at upper edge, dampstain to lower right). Morphew was a significant literary and political publisher, at one point printing works for both the Whigs and Tories, though later closely associated with the Tories. Material published about the sensitive Anglo-Swedish relations caused Morphew to be arrested in February 1717. 

 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$813
11/13/2020

2

Group of Five Revolutionary War-Era Newspapers, Including The Boston Evening-Post Single Issue Dated July 5, 1773, Plus

Lot of 6, comprising:

FLEET, Thomas (d.1797) and John FLEET (d.1806). The Boston Evening-Post. July 5, 1773. Numb. 1971. 4pp. 9.25 x 14.5 in. (top edge trimmed). 

HARRISON, Thomas. The London Gazette. January 11, 1777. No. 11734. 7.5 x 12 in. 

Letter from General George Washington printed in [The Gentleman's Magazine.] [March 1777]. Matted and framed with print after Emanuel Leutze, Washington Crossing the Delaware (original 1851 painting housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art). Sight 9.5 x 8 in., framed to 24.5 x 33.5 in. 

GAINE, Hugh (ca 1726-1807). The New York Gazette: and the Weekly Mercury. September 21, 1778. No. 1405. 4pp. 12 x 19 in. 

BARBER, Henry (1748-1800). Newport Mercury. November 23, 1782. No. 1104. [Rhode Island]. 4pp. 10.25 x 14.75 in. 

Engraving, 5.25 x 8.25 in. King George the IIId. Uncredited. Appears to be a page from book.

Estimate: $400 - $600
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,375
11/13/2020

3

Accounts of the American Revolution in Edinburgh Advertiser, 1775

Lot of 4 issues. Edinburgh Advertiser. Edinburgh [Scotland]: James Donaldson, May 19-23, October 13-17, 17-20, 27-31, 1775. Each issue 8pp, 8.25 x 11 in. 

The issues are replete with extensive coverage of events in America in the fall of 1775, including military engagements, Indian affairs, and political news. 

May 23, 1775. Complete text of “THE REMONSTRANCE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE COLONY OF NEW YORK” as introduced to the House of Commons by Edmund Burke on May 16, 1775. “Impressed with the warmest  sentiments of loyalty and affection to our most gracious sovereign, and zealously attached to his person, family, and government, we his majesty's faithful subjects...behold the deepest concern the unhappy disputes subsisting between the mother country and her colonies, convinced that the...strength of the British Empire, the protection and opulence of his majesty's American dominions, and the happiest of both, depend eventually on a restoration of harmony and affection between them…It is with inexpressive grief that we have of late years seen measures adopted by the British Parliament, subversive of that constitution under which the good people of this colony have always enjoyed the same rights and privileges so highly and deservedly prized by their fellow subjects in Great Britain...We esteem our undoubted and unalienable rights as Englishmen...nor can we forbear mentioning the jealousies which have been excited in the colonies by the extension of the limits of the province of Quebec in which the Roman Catholic religion has received such ample support...we claim but a restoration of those rights which we enjoyed by general consent before the close of the last war; we desire no more than a continuation of that ancient government to which we are entitled by the principles of the British Constitution, and which alone can be secured to us by the rights of Englishmen..." Signed by John Kruger, Speaker of the Assembly, March 25, 1775. (Complete text covering all of the front page and one third of the second page.) Coverage of the subsequent debate in Parliament following the introduction of the resolution by Burke including statements by Charles James Fox and Lord North. With detailed coverage of parliamentary debates on the REPEAL OF THE QUEBEC ACT. (more than a full page). Fine example of tax stamp on back page.

October 17, 1775: Engagement near Watertown, stating that despite “sustaining a continual fire” colonists only suffer two killed. British Naval ships attack Stonington Harbor. 700 Indians of the Mohawk and Onondaga nations arrive in Albany to declare support for the Americans. British garrison of Québec reported to be poorly defended as “Gov. Carlton had taken the greatest part of the cannon from the forts to mount on the floating batteries in St. John's.” Naval engagement with the provincials near Providence. Notice of the marriage of the Hon. JOHN HANCOCK, President of the Continental Congress, to Miss Dorothy Quincy of Boston. Indians of the Six Nations declare that “they should not take up the hatchet on either side.” Accounts from Cambridge say that 90 British troops were killed by the Americans.

October 20, 1775: Proclamation signed by Charles Thompson, Secretary of the Continental Congress, affirming that the resolution “that THE INHABITANTS OF THESE COLONIES WOULD NOT DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY EXPORT ANY MERCHANDISE OR COMMODITIES WHATSOEVER TO GREAT BRITAIN, Ireland or the West Indies” would also apply other British territories including the Channel islands. EDMUND BURKE advises the merchants of Bristol that he has presented their petition “humbly beseeching His Majesty to cause hostilities to cease in America” to His majesty KING GEORGE III. The ship Phoenix arrives with the widows of several officers “who went from Boston to New York soon after their husbands were killed in the engagement at BUNKER’S HILL.” Reports of disagreements between GENERAL PUTNAM and GENERAL WASHINGTON. Proclamation from the provincial Congress in New York protesting the actions of the Captain of his Majesty’s ship Asia who “under pretense of protecting the Kings property did in the dead of night…fire upon the south part of this defenseless city….” Continental Congress discusses plans for the MANAGEMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS and “… have appointed commissioners…with proper presents, talks, and belts of wampum and the usual necessary articles of trade for the several nations.” Major Rogers “at the head of numerous body of Indians of different tribes had declared…that for the ill-treatment he had received from the government he would do all to lay in his power to seek revenge and assist the colonies.

October 31, 1775: news from Québec that “a party of the provincials which had penetrated into Canada were attacked by Gen. Carlton at the head of about 200 regulars, and a body of Canadians. The rebels were defeated with a loss of 20 men killed and a considerable number wounded…” News from Philadelphia of the arrival of JOHN HANCOCK and PEYTON RANDOLPH and other delegates to attend the Congress. Complete text of KING GEORGE III'S SPEECH TO PARLIAMENT ON AFFAIRS IN AMERICA on October 26, 1775. “… those who have too long successfully labored to inflame my people in America by gross misrepresentations and to infuse into their minds a system of opinions repugnant to the true Constitution of the colonies, and to their subordinate relation to Great Britain, now openly avow their REVOLT, HOSTILITY AND REBELLION. They have raised troops and are collecting a naval force, they have seized the public revenue and assumed to themselves legislative, executive and judicial powers which they already exercise in the most arbitrary manner over the persons and properties of their fellow subjects.…” 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$813
11/13/2020

4

Early American Massachusetts Imprint Mr. Wigglesworth's Dudleian Lecture, Printed 1778

Wigglesworth, Edward. "The Authority of Tradition Considered, at the Lecture Founded by the Hon. Judge Dudley, in Harvard College, November 5, 1777."  Boston: Thomas & John Fleet, 1778. 39pp. Removed from boards, approx. 5.25 x 7.75 in. Owner's name handwritten in ink on top right "John Pence" along with the year 1777. Revolutionary War imprint contains the text of a lecture delivered by Edward Wigglesworth (1732-1794), the Hollis Chair of Divinity at the Harvard Divinity School from 1765-1792 (not to be confused with his father Edward Wigglesworth who held the chair before him, the first to hold that position). This imprint, identified on the cover as "Mr. Wigglesworth's Dudleian Lecture," presents a staunch attack on Roman Catholics and their Church.

Estimate: $200 - $400
Unsold

5

Lot of 6 Original Newspapers Dating from 1789-1799, Including Bill of Rights Debate Reportage

Lot of 6 mid-to-late 18th-century American newspapers, comprising: 

Pennsylvania Packet, and Daily Advertiser. Philadelphia, PA. August 21, 1789. No. 3294. 4pp, 11.5 x 18.25 in. Reports on the Bill of Rights debated in Congress and debates on the amendments of the Constitution in a report from the House of Representatives, August 17, 1789: "Meeting in Committee of the Whole on the Subject of Amendments to the Consitution," draft amendments 8 and 9 approved, as was 10 with changes. Amendments 11-14 “agreed to in their original form.” Elbridge Gerry introduced a motion “That such amendments of the Constitution of the United States as have been proposed by the different states…be referred to the committee of the whole house and that those, with the amendments proposed by that committee, be included in one report.…”  James Madison argued for amendments to guarantee individual rights in a speech in the House on June 8, 1789. Madison’s draft amendments along with proposals from the states were debated in the House and eventually approved by the House and the Senate. In September 1789, a conference committee proposed twelve amendments that were sent to the states. By 15 December 1791, three-fourths of the state legislatures adopted ten of the amendments. Also includes Indian Affairs content with Creek leader Alexander McGillibray writing on peace negotiations: “the chiefs have resolved to put off the meeting for the present…the body of warriors were in arms, owing to the commissioner's letter of last winter… but the Chiefs being ready to listen to just terms of peace, they agreed to meet the commissioners to treat as they requested; but some parties had gone out could not be stopped...having done mischief and killing several people, the...people stopped the Chiefs from proceeding to the Oconee, apprehensive that they may sustain injury and insult form the people of that country, the Chickasaws..."


Windham Herald. Wyndham, CT. December 12, 1789. Vol. IX No. 458. 4pp, 10.5 x 16.5, on blue paper. Front-page text of the speech by President John Adams to Congress in Philadelphia on Dec. 3. He presses Congress for reforms in the judicial system and addresses relations with the French republic, reports on plans to move the national capital. Message signed in type by Adams. Also includes a complete list of all of the vessels in the American Navy.  (Occsional spotting, worn edges, previously bound.) 

Weekly Museum. New York, NY. April 4, 1795. Vol VII No. 360. 4pp, 9.5 x 11.75 in. Notice of the “United States Lotter for the improvement of the city of Washington will commence in a few days..." (Bifolium split, worn edges with a few small tears, some spotting.)

Colombian Centinel. Boston, MA. August 12, 1797. Vol. XXVII No. 36, Whole No. 1398. 4pp, 11.75 x 19.25 in. Entire front page devoted to the text of a new stamp tax, with news form the Congress in Philadelphia, May 15, 1797. With the full text of “An Act Laying Duties on Stamped Vellum Parchment and Paper" which included duties on a range of documents including certificates of naturalization, letters patent, and wills (which was the effective introduction of an estate tax). Complete text signed in script type by John Adams  as President of the United States. Revenues from requiring a federal stamp on wills in probate and other documents were used to pay off debts incurred during the undeclared naval war with France. Congress repealed the Stamp Act in 1802. Also includes reports on naval conflict with France, with American ships detained at Cape Francois in Haiti by the French, including the schooner Hetty of Charleston. (Some spotting, previously bound) 

The Spectator. New York, NY. July 10, 1799 (subscriber’s copy of Yale College). Vol. II No. 187. 4pp, 13.25 x 20 in. Front-page account of an act passed by the Congress on December 3, 1798: "An Act Providing for Compensation for Collectors of Customs throughout the United States" approved and signed in type by President John Adams, March 2, 1799 Reports on the undeclared naval war with France, includes a front-page printing of treasury circular signed in type by Oliver Wolcott suspending commercial trade with France, and complaints of American ship captains reporting on attacks on Americans in the port of Curracoa (Curacao): "We, Masters of American vessels now in this port, do declare that...a number of seamen belonging to our vessels, were without provocation, wantonly attacked, and some of them curelly wounded and beaten, by some French People, armed with knives pistols etc. We their captains and officers hearing of this, went to assist in restoring peace; when we got to the scene…a general scuffle took place; the guard then arrived bringing with them an unusual number of armed Frenchman, mulattos and some slaves…. the guard conveyed the whole of us to prison, suffering the negroes and others to wound, beat and abuse us at pleasure…without giving us the protection that our situation demanded...” Also includes Indian Affairs content with the Creek Indians expressing concerns about the extension of the boundary between the US and Spanish Territory, with Chief Methlogey writing “I being informed only 13 days past, from the mouth of the Spanish officer commanding the Spanish garrisons at St. Mark…that there was a line now running by the Spanish people and the Americans which would run into several of the Indian towns and that all of the Indians that fell on the Spanish side line, the men would be made slaves to work on the ground for the Spaniards…" James Seagrove responding: “You and all the Creek people must know that the great River Mississippi is a line between the Spanish and American settlements on the west side; and that the Spanish nation hath long, and still do possess the seacoast from the Mississippi River to St. Mary's pier. It therefore became absolutely necessary, that it be clearly and well understood how far the territory or government extended back, from the seacoast into the country.… I do declare to you and the whole of the Creek Nation, that I then and still do, consider the running of the said line, as quite harmless to you or your interests, and purely intended to fix the line of territorial jurisdiction between the United States and the Spanish Government.  Seagrove was the former emissary of the US Government to the Creek nation. In 1796, the Treaty of Colerain between the Creeks and United States was signed at the small town Seagrove had founded. Includes a runaway slave notice: “$10 reward RUNAWAY FROM SUBSCRIBER, AN NEGRO MAN NAMED HARRY about 20 years of age; he is near 5 feet eight inches high and wears his hair tied.… Whoever takes in the said Negro and gives information to his master shall have the above reward and all reasonable expenses…" (Occasional spotting, worn edges, previously bound.)

Salem Gazette. Salem, MA. November 26, 1799. Vol. XIII No. 865. 4pp, 11.25 x 18.75. A front-page notice from the War Department: "All officers of the first regiment of artillerists and engineers, and of the first, second, third and fourth regiments of infantry in the service of the United States, who are from whatever cause, absent from their commands, are required with all possible expects addition to report themselves by letter to Maj. Gen. Alexander Hamilton." The case of Jonathan Robbins who had been executed by the British navy for mutiny claiming he was an impressed American citizen. “It is at length proved by evidence…that Robbins was not a Native American…. Americans have been ready to approve and justify his foul unnatural deeds… It is been asserted… That Robbins, alias Thomas Nash was an impressed American seaman. … It is fair to conclude that he took the leading part…in the cruel murder which ensued, solely from thirst for plunder.” Robbins was the leader of a rebellion on an English ship in the midst of the Napoleonic wars. He was hung in chains for his part in the shipboard mutiny and surrendered to British military justice despite his last moment claim that he was an American impressed into the British navy. Robbins’s story provoked a huge argument among Americans. (Worn edges, some soiling.)

 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,500
11/13/2020

6

Letter to Captain George Buckmaster, Orders Re: Brig. Cicero, 1768

Senders appear to be a group of fellow owners of the Brig. Cicero, AL, Newport, 28 Dec. 1768, 1p (7.25 x 14.5 in.). To Captain George Buckmaster (1720-1791). The co-owners order the captain to "...proceed directly to Georgia, and their [sic] dispose of your Cargo and also your Vesil [sic], if you can obtain anything near her value, or we had rather part with her for 300 pounds rather than take the chance of a loosing voyage to the West Indies....You are not limited to any particular Port, nor confined to the Place from whence you are to return to this place... only observe this Rule, not to indanger the Vesil and Cargo..."

It would appear that Buckmaster had an earlier problem. In a letter from Benjamin Franklin to Deborah Franklin dated 10 June 1758, Franklin writes: "Cousin Buckmaster has suffered much, and had a narrow Escape. I am concerned for his double Misfortune. A Ship and a Mistress are too much to lose at once...." Buckmaster's first wife was Abiah Franklin (presumably a niece or cousin of Franklin's. His mother was Abiah, which likely was a family name. He had about 16 siblings, one of whom surely named their offspring for their mother!)

Estimate: $200 - $400
Unsold

7

Revolutionary War-Era Autographs, Incl. Thomas Mifflin and Frederick Frelinghuysen

Lot of 2.

Mifflin, Thomas (1744-1800). Signature on part of a larger document, which has been torn off to about 5.75 in. The remaining top portion still retains the official seal. Matted and framed with an engraving of Mifflin, a Pennsylvania  fifteen shilling note (issue of 1 October 1773) and a short biography.The whole in a carved wood frame (maple?),  29.5 x 35.5 in.

At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Mifflin was appointed Major of a Continental Army regiment and in 1775 became one of George Washington's aides-de-camp. a few months later he was appointed Quartermaster General of the Continental forces. By December he was a Colonel, and in May 1776, Brigadier General. He achieved the rank of Major General in February 1777. Mifflin fought at many of the major battles, including Princeton and Trenton (NJ). After the war he was appointed to the Continental Congress and served as its President from Dec. 1783 to June 1784. He served on the Federal Convention in 1787 and the Pennsylvania executive council the following year. He was on the state constitutional committee, serving as its chairman 1789-1790. This put him in position to be chosen as the first Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania serving three terms from 1700 to 1799.

Frelinghuysen, Frederick (1753-1804). Clipped signature on 1.5 x 7 in. piece of paper (sight). Matted with print of a Revolutionary War battle and a short biography. Born in Somerville, New Jersey, Frelinghuysen graduated from the College of New Jersey with a law degree in 1770. He was a major in the local militia, and thus in a position of leadership from the beginning of the revolution. He became a captain of artillery and ADC to General Dickinson. In 1778 he was elected to the Continental Congress, serving 1778-1779 and 1782-1783. He was a member of the New Jersey convention that ratified the Constitution. George Washington appointed him Brigadier General in the fight against western Indians in 1790. He also commanded New Jersey forces in the Whiskey Rebellion of 1794 and was subsequently commissioned Major General.

Estimate: $400 - $600
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$250
11/13/2020

8

Oliver Ellsworth Receives Payment for Serving as Attorney, Signed Pay Voucher, 1780

A manuscript signed pay voucher to Oliver Ellsworth, approx. 8 x 6.5 in. Sent to John Lawrence from George Clark, dated September 16, 1780. An order to pay Ellsworth £354.25 for his service as attorney for the state of Connecticut. 

Ellsworth (1745-1807) was a framer of the United States Constitution, a United States Senator from Connecticut, and the third Chief Justice of the United States. 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Unsold

9

Revolutionary War-Era Pay Statements Signed by Jedediah Huntington and Oliver Wolcott, Jr.

Lot of 2 Revolutionary War-era pay statements, comprising:

Manuscript Connecticut pay statement signed by Jedediah Huntington as brigadier general in the Continental Army, 2 July 1781, 7.5 x 4.5 in. Major John Ripley is to be paid 100 pounds. 

Huntington (1743-1818) was heavily involved in the Revolution War first with the Norwich military company, later as a colonel with the 20th Regiment of Connecticut Militia, commanded the newly formed 8th Regiment starting in July 1775 which was reorganized as the 17th Continental Regiment with the organization of the Continental Army on Jan. 1, 1776. He was placed in command of the 1st Regiment and later promoted to brigadier general on May 12, 1777, with three Connecticut regiments were placed under his command. He was brevetted as a major general at the conclusion of the war in 1783. 

Partly-printed Connecticut pay statement signed by Oliver Wolcott, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury, 1 April 1783, 6.5 x 5.5 in. Capt. Daniel Allen is to be paid 13 pounds and two shillings. 

Wolcott, Jr. (1760-1833) served in the Continental Army from 1777-1779, he served as the clerk of the Connecticut Committee on Pay-Table from 1781-1782, and a full member from 1782-1784. After the war he was appointed as the second Secretary of the Treasury (1795-1800) by George Washington. He also served as a judge on the Second Circuit of the United States Circuit Court (1801-1802) and as the 24th Governor of Connecticut (1817-1827). 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Unsold

10

Connecticut Western Reserve Deed, 1799, Signed by Several Prominent Figures incl. Revolutionary War General Roger Newberry

Connecticut Western Reserve Deed for 15,004 acres in Braceville, 9.5 x 15.25 in. 4pp, 2nd leaf in 3 fragments. With red wax seal Hartford City Notary Public. Dated October 1, 1802, and expanded on April 2, 1803. 

From the Connecticut Land Company to original purchasers Roger Newberry, Jonathan Brace, and Enoch Perkins of Connecticut; then to an expanded purchasing group of Jonathan Brace, Enoch Perkins, Roger Newberry, and Justin Ely, of Massachusetts and Eliah White and Pardon Brown of Connecticut. 

Rober Newberry (1753-1814) was a major figure in the Connecticut Milita during the Revolution War, commanding the first regiment from May 1777 through February 1781. 

Jonathan Brace (1754-1837) was a lawyer and politician who was a member of the Connecticut General Assembly (1788, 1791-1794), a judge in Hartford (1797-1815), and a Federalist representative in the US House of Representatives (1798-1800). 

 

Estimate: $300 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$469
11/13/2020

11

Currier American Revolution Lithographs, Lot of 3

Lot of 3.

CURRIER, Nathaniel (1813-1888), publisher. 

Surrender of Cornwallis, at York-Town VA. Oct. 1781 (C.5904; G.6369); Washington. First in War, First in Peace, and First in the Hearts of His Countrymen (C.6538; G.7038); The Declaration of Independence. July 4th 1776 (C.1532; G.1665).

3 lithographs with hand-coloring, 1845; small folio, visible images approx. 9 x 12.5 in., toned, framed (not examined out of frame). 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$375
11/13/2020

12

War of 1812, Lot of 10 Original Newspapers Covering Important Naval Developments

Lot of 10 newspapers. 

Caledonian Mercury. Edinburgh: September 7, 1812. WAR DECLARED: News from his HMS Guerriere July 29, 1812 “…we were proceeding on our way to Halifax to refit, when we were stopped by the North American squadron, and we learned that the AMERICANS HAD DECLARED WAR AGAINST GREAT BRITAIN, and that their squadron was at sea, under the command of Commodore Rodgers, consisting of three frigates and two sloops of war… As soon as the President's proclamation arrived at Halifax, the Adm. proceeded to sea in quest of Rogers… On the 16th when we were separated from our squadron, about 4 pm we gave chase to a large American frigate… We therefore tacked and stood after them… A calm took place and we got our boats out and endeavored to tow the ship, but although every exertion was made, she got away after a chase of 64 hours.… We have reason to believe that it was the Constitution, going out to join the American Commodore.”

Colombian Centinel. Boston: September 16, 1812. CONSTITUTION VS. GUERRIERE: Front page printing of naval official letters including CAPTAIN HULL’S OFFICIAL ACCOUNT OF THE ENGAGEMENT AGAINST THE GUERRIERE: “Sir I have the honor to inform you that on the 19th at 2 PM… with the Constitution under my command, a sail was discovered…bearing E by S or E by SE….All sail was instantly made…and we soon found we came up on her.… As soon as the Constitution was ready for action, I bore down with the intention to bring him to close action immediately; but on our coming within gun shot she gave us a broadside and sailed away…giving us a broadside on the other tack, but without effect; her shot falling short. She continued wearing and maneuvering for about three quarters of an hour, to get a raking position… I immediately made sail to bring the ship up with her, and five minutes before 6 PM being alongside within half a pistol shot, we commenced a heavy fire from all our guns, double shotted with round and grape, and so well directed were they and so warmly kept up, that in 15 minutes his mizzen mast went by the board and his main yard in the slings, and the hull, rigging and sails very much torn to pieces. The fire was kept up with equal warmth for 15 minutes longer, when his mainmast and foremast went taking with them every spar accepting the bowsprit… IN 30 MINUTES AFTER WE GOT FAIRLY ALONGSIDE THE ENEMY AND SHE SURRENDERED, AND HAD NOT A SPAR STANDING AND HER HULL BELOW AND ABOVE THE WATER SO SHATTERED, THAT FEW MORE BROADSIDES MUST HAVE CARRIED HER DOWN. After informing you that so fine a ship as the Guerriere, commanded by an able and experienced officer, had been totally dismasted and otherwise cut to pieces so as to make are not worth towing into port, in the short space of 30 minutes you can have no doubt of the gallantry and good conduct of the officers and the ships company I have the honor to command…" With list of killed and wounded. Also front-page British official accounts of the SURRENDER OF FORT DETROIT including the text of the articles of capitulation signed by Brigadier General William Hull, commanding the Northwest Army of the United States, and Maj. General William Brock commanding his Britannic Majesty's forces in Upper Canada. Worn at right margin with some loss of text, not affecting Captain Hull’s reports.

Colombian Centinel. October 10, 1812. AMERICAN SQUADRON HEADS TO SEA. “On Thursday last the frigate President, 44 guns, Commodore Rodgers; United States, 44, Commodore Decatur; Congress, 36, Capt. Smith, and Argus brig, 14, Capt. Sinclair, left this harbor with fine wind, bound on a cruise. Though we abhor the war that they are engaged in, if they must fight, they have our best wishes for glorious success; and from the superior discipline and energy of the cruise, and the intelligence of the officers, they have also our confidence of their triumph over equal force. The Constitution, Chesapeake and Hornet are in port fitting for sea. The Essex of 32, and Wasp, 18 guns are in Delaware ready for sea.”

Caledonian Mercury. October 15, 1812. CONSTITUTION VS GUERRIERE: Official British account of the engagement between the USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere. Letter from Vice Adm. Sawyer to John Wilson Croker conveying a letter from Capt. James Dacres with an account of the loss of the Guerriere:I AM SORRY TO INFORM YOU OF THE CAPTURE OF HIS MAJESTY'S LATE SHIP GUERRIERE BY THE AMERICAN FRIGATE CONSTITUTION, AFTER SEVERE ACTION, ON THE 19TH AUGUST… we hoisted our colors and fired several shots at her…she hoisted her colors and returned our fire, wore several times to avoid being raked, exchanging broadsides.… And 20 minutes past five our mizzen mast went over the starboard quarter, and brought the ship up the wind; the enemy then placed himself on our larboard bow, raking us… his grape and rifleman sweeping our deck….at 20 minutes past six our fore and mainmast went over the side leaving the ship a perfect unmanageable wreck…. When calling all officers together, they were all of the opinion that any further resistance would only be a needless waste of lives; I ordered, reluctantly, the colors to be struck. The loss of the ship is to be ascribed to the early fall of the mizzen mast, which enabled our opponent to choose his position. I'm sorry to say that we suffered severely in killed and wounded and most severely from grape and musketry, and all 15 killed and 63 wounded, many of them severely… THE FRIGATE PROVED TO BE THE UNITED STATES SHIP CONSTITUTION of 30 24 pounders on her main deck and 24 32 pounders and two 18 pounders on her upper deck and 476 men… The Guerriere was so cut up that all attempts to get her in would have been useless. As soon as the wounded were got out of her they set her on fire….I feel it my duty to state that the conduct of Capt. Hull to our officers to our men has been that of a brave enemy… The greatest attention being paid to the wounded…” With “Complete list of officers, seamen and Marines killed and wounded on board his Majesty ship Guerriere in the action of 19 August 1812.

Colombian Centinel. February 24, 1813. CONSTITUTION VS. JAVA. “Another naval triumph…an officer of the US frigate Constitution has just landed at Newcastle… With dispatches announcing the CAPTURE THE BRITISH FRIGATE JAVA BY THE CONSTITUTION… December 29, 1812 we cried a sail which we soon discovered to be an English frigate. We took in mainsail and royals, tacked ship and stood for her.… A general action with round and grapeshot commenced, the enemy keeping the much greater distance than we wished, but we could not bring him to close action without exposing ourselves to severe raking.… At 2 PM commenced action with good grapeshot canister distance. At 30 minutes past 2 our wheel was shot entirely away…..determined to close with the enemy notwithstanding his raking fire… At 3 the enemy’s bowsprit and jib boom shot away by us.… At 3:15 shot away the enemy’s main topsail topmast.… At 55 minutes past 3 shot away their mizzen mast nearly by the board…. having completely silenced the enemy…we supposed that he had struck… At 20 minutes past 4 the enemy's mainmast went by the board… At the very instance of our preparing to give our broadside the enemy prudently struck his colors. Lieut. Parker was sent on board to take possession of the prize, which proved to be his Majesty ship Java, rated 38 put manning 49 guns, commanded by Capt. Lambert, a distinguished officer (who is mortally wounded) with a crew of upwards of 400 men…

Colombian Centinel. March 24, 1813. HORNET VS. PEACOCK. “Fifth Naval Triumph…on Monday evening handbills were received… announcing the CAPTURE AND DESTRUCTION OF THE BRITISH BRIG THE WAR PEACOCK, OF 19 GUNS, BY THE UNITED STATES SHIP HORNET, OF 16 GUNS, Capt. Lawrence, off Surinam…” With extracts of logbook: “Thursday, 25 February 1813 at 3:30 PM discovered a strange sail bearing down on us… She hoisted English colors… At 4:30 beat to quarters… At 5:25 passing each other, exchanged broadsides within pistol shot… we kept up such a heavy and well directed fire that in less than 15 minutes she made the signal of submission, being cut to pieces, and five minutes later after, her mainmast went by the board. Sent our First Lieut. on board returning with her First Lieut. who reported her to be his Britannic Majesty Majesty's brig Peacock mounting 19 guns and 134 men… her commander Capt. Peake was killed in the action, a great number of her men killed and wounded and that she was sinking fast; we dispatched the boats immediately to take out the wounded in the rest of the prisoners and brought both vessels to anchor, but notwithstanding every exertion was made to save the crew, she unfortunately sank carrying down 10 of her crew, and three of my brave fellows…

Colombian Centinel. June 12, 1813. NAVAL ENGAGEMENT ON LAKE CHAMPLAIN: “The US sloop Growler, of 12, and Eagle, of 10 guns, under Lieut. Smith, left this place for the purpose of annoying the British in the River Chamblee, where they gave chase to two or three gunboats and were drawn into an ambuscade and shoal water; there they were attacked by a body of five or 600 militia and regulars and three gunboats. THE BATTLE ENSUED WHICH LASTED FIVE OR SIX HOURS, DURING WHICH THE EAGLE FOUNDERED AND SOON AFTER THE GROWLER SURRENDERED… The capture the growler gives the enemy the command of the Lake and manned her immediately, and proceeded in search of the President." Account of the ATTACK ON SACKETTS HARBOR. “the British flotilla consisted of the Wolfe, 24 guns, Royal George, 24, Earl Moira, 18, Prince Regent 10, Simcoe, 12, and Seneca 10… daybreak the next day they affected the landing on Horne Island to the number of 800, forded the neck under heavy fire from troops under General Brown… In which several the enemy were killed… The enemy gained the mainland and compelled our troops retreat about a mile… The enemy was checked for nearly an hour and a half… And then retreated taking off their wounded…

Colombian Centinel. June 19, 1813. CHESAPEAKE VS. SHANNON. British account of the capture of the Chesapeake. “It is with pleasure that we congratulate our readers on the CAPTURE THE AMERICAN FRIGATE CHESAPEAKE COMMANDED BY CAPT. LAWRENCE, BY HIS MAJESTY'S SHANNON, CAPT. BROKE, AND AFTER AN ACTION OF 11 MINUTES.… Early in the morning of the 1st the Shannon stood in close to the Boston lighthouse and observed the Chesapeake lying at anchor.… 12:30 she weighed anchor and stood out of the harbor… At 5:30 she luffed up to the Shannon's weather quarter and on her foremast coming in line with the Shannon's mizzen, the latter fired the after gun and others successively until the enemy came directly abreast, when the church Chesapeake fired her whole broadside which the Shannon immediately returned; and here broadside to broadside the action commenced; in five minutes the Chesapeake fell alongside the Shannon and was boarded in her tops as well as on her decks by our gallant countrymen, and in 11 minutes from the commencement the action her three ensigns were hauled down, and soon afterwards replaced the English flag over them… Capt. Broke we understand nobly led the boarders from the quarterdeck, and his we are sorry to say, severely wounded, in the moment of victory, by saber on the head… We rejoice to learn he is in a fair way of recovery…” British account of the funeral of Captain Lawrence: “The respect due to a brave enemy yesterday was shown to the remains of Capt. Lawrence. The corpse was landed from the Chesapeake under discharge of minute guns, and at 2 o'clock reached the Kings wharf, the American ensign was spread over the coffin, on which was placed the sword of the deceased…six captains of the Navy officiated as pallbearers…” Americans surprised by British at Lake Ontario: “Information is just been received that our Army at the head of the Lake Ontario has been surprised in their camp. General's Winder and Chandler, quartermaster Vandeventer, Capt. Jones, four pieces of artillery and 150 men were taken. General Vincent was killed in our camp.

Colombian Centinel. June 26, 1813. CHESAPEAKE VS. SHANNON. “In the ship Henry… Mr. Chew, late master of the Chesapeake frigate and two midshipmen arrived as passengers. Mr. Chew was the bearer of an official account of the loss that frigate… which was immediately transmitted to Washington…" List of killed and wounded in the engagement. Funeral of Capt. Lawrence: “by the British naval and military orders for the internment of Capt. Lawrence and Lieut. Ludlow, with the honors of war, every mark of respect was paid to their memories. The Garrison was ordered to wear black crêpe on their left arm.” Addition description from an officer of the Chesapeake: “in six or seven minutes after the fight began the cockpit was literally so filled with wounded, that we could hardly get to anyone without stepping on another; so that we could not get the poor fellows all dressed until late the next day. The weather was all the time extremely fortunate, and we have now all the wounded in a fine hospital.

The Times. London: July 9, 1813. CHESAPEAKE VS. SHANNON. Sec. of the Admiralty John Wilson Croker speaks to Parliament on the capture of the Chesapeake by HMS Shannon:The action which he (Capt. Broke) fought with the Chesapeake was…unequaled….by any engagement which graced the naval annals of Great Britain. The enemy ship was superior in size, superior in weigh of metal, superior numbers. She entered into the contest with a previous conviction of all their superior advantages, and with a confirmed confidence of victory… All of the superiority serve but to heighten the brilliancy of Capt. Broke’s achievement… Capt. Broke was wounded… On the deck of the enemy's ship… The Chesapeake had made every possible preparation for the engagement. She came out of harbor in full sail…. The order for boarding was given by Capt. Broke….The boarders rushed at once and the same moment from every part of the Shannon into the enemy ship. The Chesapeake was carried and was in our possession in the course of three minutes.… Capt. Broke was cut down by saber blow, on the forecastle of the Chesapeake…” Holes at centerfold with some loss of text.

Estimate: $300 - $500
Unsold

13

Assorted Historical Newspapers Including 1850 Issue of The Liberator Featuring Reportage on the Fugitive Slave Law, Lot of 7

Lot of 7 historical American newspapers, notably including: 

The Liberator. Boston, MA. October 25, 1850. Vol. XX No. 43, Whole No. 1033. 4pp, 18.25 x 24.75 in. Ownership inscription above masthead: "Miss Louisa Simes." With extensive front-page coverage of the Fugitive Slave Act and an article on the "Imprisonment of Colored Seamen." The Fugitive Slave Acto of 1850 had been made law less than a month earlier on September 18th. 

Other newspapers include: 

Gazette of the United States, & Daily Advertiser. Philadelphia, PA. April 1, 1801. Vol. XIX No. 2655. 4pp, 12.75 x 19.75 in. With report from the Sixth Congress. 

Charleston Courier. Charleston, [SC]. June 18, 1807. Vol. V No. 1370. 4pp, 12 x 19.5 in. 

Cincinnati Weekly Gazette. Cincinnati, OH. March 13, 1861. Vol. LXIX No. 39. 4pp, 24.5 x 31 in. Front-page reports on speeches made by William H. Seward and Salmon P. Chase. 

Daily Evening Traveller. Boston, MA. January 13, 1862. Vol. XVII No. 242. 4pp, 20.75 x 26 in. 

The Baltimore Gazette. Baltimore, MD. November 3, 1868. Vol. IX No. 1881. 4pp, 21.5 x 30 in. With reports on the 1868 election. 

The Evening News. Baltimore, MD. July 31, 1873. Vol. II No. 75. 4pp, 12 x 18 in. 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$281
11/13/2020

14

The Liberator, Final Issue Dated December 29, 1865 Featuring Garrison's "Valedictory" Column

The Liberator. Boston, MA: William Lloyd Garrison, December 29, 1865. Vol. XXXV, No. 52. 4pp. 18.5 x 26 in. This final issue of the famous abolitionist newspaper features a "Valedictory" column by its prominent editor, William Lloyd Garrison. The farewell address emphasizes the radical nature of the paper and the ridicule it provoked: "From the immense change wrought in the national feeling and sentiment on the subject of slavery, the Liberator derived no advantage at any time in regard to its circulation. The original 'disturber of the peace,' nothing was left undone at the beginning, and up to the hour of the late rebellion...it always required rare moral courage or singular personal independence to be among its patrons. Never had a journal to look such opposition in the face—never was one so constantly belied and caricatured."

Garrison defends his at times unpopular position with fervor, writing: "Better to be always in a minority of one with God—branded as madman, incendiary, fanatic, heretic, infidel—frowned upon by 'the powers that be,' and mobbed by the populace—or consigned ignominiously to the gallows...than like Herod, having the shouts of a multitude crying, 'It is the voice of a god, and not of a man!'" He then bids farewell to his readership and ends the address with a final invocation for liberty for all. 

Estimate: $150 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$313
11/13/2020

15

War of 1812 Veteran's Handwritten Patriotic Poem, "Bill Johnston," with References to the Secession of the South

Manuscript poem, 2pp, 7.75 x 10.875 in., entitled "Bill Johnston." Autographed "Simon [?] Barclay." Poem emphasizes the heroic nature of a War of 1812 veteran through an imagined conversation between the veteran, Bill Johnston, and his "General" in which Johnston pleads to go to war for the Union. War of 1812 veteran, reading, in part: "Have you forgotten General the battered soldier cried / The days of eighteen hundred and twelve when I was at your side / Have you forgotten Johnston that fought at Lundy's lane / Tis true I'm old pensioned but I want to fight again...If they should fire on Pickens hit the Colonel in command / Put me upon the rampart with the flag staff in my hand / No odd how hot the cannon smoke or how the shell may fly / I'll hold the stars and stripes aloft and hold them till I die...And when the fight is hottest before the traitors fly / When shell and ball are screeching bursting in the sky / I if any shot should hit me and lay me on my face / My soul would go to Washing and not to Arnold's place." 

The Battle of Lundy's Lane, referenced in this poem, took place on July 25, 1814 and was one of the bloodiest battles of the War of 1812. American forces attacked British forces in Canada to no avail, as both sides were heavily battered and the conflict ended without any conclusive victor. British forces defended their position atop Lundy's Lane, thus preventing American advancement, but American forces were able to retreat without contest from the exhausted British. 

Estimate: $100 - $150
Unsold

16

CDVs and Cabinet Card of General Edmund P. Gaines and his Wife Myra Clark Gaines, Plus

Lot of 4, including CDV of General Edmund Pendleton Gaines (1777-1849) in uniform, originally taken ca 1845. Mathew Brady: New York, n.d., ca 1860s; CDV of Gaine's third wife, Mrs. Myra Clark Gaines (1804-1885), period ink identification on mount below image. E. & H.T. Anthony/Brady: New York, n.d., ca 1860s; and cabinet card of "Mrs. Gen'l. Gaines," as printed on mount recto. C.D. Fredricks & Co.: New York, n.d., ca 1870s. 

During the early 19th Century, Edmund Gaines surveyed routes and boundaries in the Mississippi Territory including parts of the Natchez Trace. In 1807, Gaines was the commandant of Fort Stoddard. During this time, he arrested Aaron Burr and testified at his trial. Gaines also surveyed the route that would become the portion of the Gaines Trace from the Tennessee River to Cotton Gin Port, Mississippi. He afterwards took a leave of absence from the army to practice law. The War of 1812 brought Gaines back to the army and he was appointed major of the 8th US Infantry and in July, 1812, and was made a lieutenant colonel in the 24th US Infantry with distinction at the Battle of Chrysler's Farm. He became adjutant general and was with General William Henry Harrison's army at the Battle of the Thames. He was promoted brigadier general of regulars on March 9, 1814 and commanded the post at Fort Erie after the US capture. General Jacob Brown was wounded at the Battle of Lundy's Lane and when the US Army of the Niagara returned to the fort, command was passed to Gaines. At the Siege of Fort Erie, Gaines was in command of the fortifications on August 15, 1814, when a British assault was bloodily repulsed. For this victory, the First Battle of Fort Erie - Gaines was awarded the Thanks of Congress, an Act of Congress Gold Medal (outranking a Congressional Medal of Honor, according to the Smithsonian), and a brevet promotion to major general. General Gaines was seriously wounded by artillery fire and General Brown, having recovered, returned to command. Gaines' wound ended his active field career for the rest of the war, and he was given command of the Military District Number 6. 

Gaines married Myra Clark Gaines, the illegitimate daughter of Daniel Clark (1766-1813), who was engaged in land speculation and banking in Mississippi and Louisiana territories and amassed huge wealth. His daughter, Myra Clark, conducted the longest court case in US history in the mid to late 19th century against the City of New Orleans trying to regain her inheritance she felt due through her father Daniel Clark. 

With engraving of Zachary Taylor, 5.75 x 9 in. Maj. Gen. Zachary Taylor. Engraved by T.H. Welch: Philadelphia, n.d. Printed by A.E. Lent & Co. After daguerreotype by Maguire. Taylor's facsimile signature below portrait. 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$125
11/13/2020

17

CDV of Robert Parrott, Inventor of the Parrott Rifle, by F. Wheeler, Cold Spring, NY

CDV vignetted portrait of Robert Parrot (1804-1877). F. Wheeler: Cold Spring, NY, n.d. Imprint on verso. Recto pencil inscribed: "Robt. Parrott / of Parrott Gun / Fame." Additional verso pencil inscription: " Robt. Parrott owner / of West Point / Foundry.

Parrott attended the United States Military Academy at West Point, graduating third in the Class of 1824. Upon graduation, he served as a second lieutenant with the 3rd US Artillery while also working as an instructor at West Point. In 1836, he resigned from the army and became the superintendent of the West Point Iron and Cannon Foundry in Cold Spring, NY, where this image was taken. He invented the Parrott rifle, an innovative muzzle-loading rifled artillery weapon made with a combination of cast and wrought iron. It was manufactured in different sizes from a 10-pounder up to 300-pounder. First produced in 1860, Parrott guns were used extensively in the Civil War on both sides. 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$200
11/13/2020

18

Sixth Plate Ruby Ambrotype Seated Portrait of a New Jersey Militia Private with Shako

Brilliant sixth plate, hand-tinted ruby ambrotype portrait of a dashing militia private with incredibly sharp detail, highlighted by the stitching on the edges of the cartridge box and the "US" stamped into the cap box he has at his side. Although first suggested that this was a New York militia private, a savvy customer has reached out to note that this is more than likely a New Jersey militiaman. 

The private soldier appears to be wearing a frock coat in dark blue with cadet grey trousers, basically a state copy of the 1857 US dress regulations. The folded overcoat probably of sky blue contrasts nicely with the grey trousers. The shako or cap is the older M1851 pattern having shako plate topped with a horse head and white pom-pom. The horse head was used by New Jersey and can also be seen on the New Jersey state seal, along with other details shown on the shake plate design. A metallic US shield device is set into the top of the shako at the edge of the crown which may point to a specific regiment that, at present, we are unable to identify. 

The image dates to just before the Civil War or just after the start, ca 1861. 

Housed in full case under glass with preserver, but lacking mat. 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$625
11/13/2020

19

Quarter Plate Tintype of 146th NY Volunteer, "Garrard's Tigers" Zouave Regiment

Quarter plate tintype portrait of a soldier sitting on a bench/trunk in a studio setting with a painted camp scene serving as the backdrop. Housed in full, pressed paper case. The subject is clad in the Zouave-style uniform of baggy blue trousers and red sash characteristic of the 146th New York Regiment, also known as “Garrard’s Tigers.” While the subject is unidentified, a modern paper label accompanying the image suggests that the subject may be Edward Paine or George Tibbets, although these identifications cannot be confirmed. 

Estimate: $300 - $500
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$750
11/13/2020

20

Quarter Plate Tintype of Union Cavalryman

Quarter plate tintype of an unidentified cavalry sergeant. Uncredited. A full-length studio portrait where the jaunty officer holds one hand on his hip and the other holds his sword. He stands in front of a painted backdrop to look like camp and wears his uniform and slouch hat with his bottoms and insignia highlighted in gold. Housed in a pressed paper case. 

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$469
11/13/2020

21

Quarter Plate Tintype of Unidentified Double-Armed Union Soldier

Quarter plate tintype full standing portrait of an unidentified soldier in full uniform including US belt plate, breast plate, and kepi, and armed with a bayoneted rifle and revolver. Housed in pressed paper case fully separated at spine. 

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$594
11/13/2020

22

Quarter Plate Tintype of Three Western Theater Union Soldiers

Quarter plate tintype of three Union soldiers, each wearing a slouch hat, seated on a bench in what appears to be a studio, with a painted camp scene serving as the backdrop. Housed in full, pressed paper case separated at spine. Although the soldiers' regiment and location are unknown, it has been suggested that this trio served in the Western Theater. 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$138
11/13/2020

23

Sixth Plate Ambrotype of Triple-Armed Union Private

Sixth plate ambrotype of an unidentified triple armed Union private. Uncredited. The private is photographed wearing his uniform holding a bayonetted rifle and a knife and revolver tucked in his belt. His belt fittings, buttons, and bayonet handle are hand-tinted with gold. Housed in a thermoplastic case. [Berg 3-147]. 

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$688
11/13/2020

24

Sixth Plate Ruby Ambrotype of Union Artilleryman

Sixth plate ruby ambrotype of an unidentified Union artilleryman. Uncredited. A studio portrait of the soldier, he is seated above a painted forest backdrop. One hand rests on his lap the other holds his forage cap on top of a walking stick or perhaps his sword. His cheeks and uniform piping are hand-tinted in red and his uniform buttons and shoulder straps are tinted with gold. Housed in a pressed paper case. 

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$500
11/13/2020

25

Oval Tintype of Unidentified Soldier, Possibly 7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Oval tintype, 2 x 2.5 in., featuring an unidentified seated soldier in uniform, with buttons highlighted in gold. Housed in an oval velvet push button case. Consignor relates this item came with a large collection of 7th OVI items.

Estimate: $150 - $250
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$88
11/13/2020

26

Sixth Plate Ambrotype of Navy Sailor with Young Boy

Sixth plate ambrotype portrait of a seated Navy sailor with a young boy standing next to him, touching his arm. Housed in pressed paper case fully separated at spine. Back of case with two two-cent revenue stamps with 1864 postmarks. 

Estimate: $150 - $250
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$281
11/13/2020

27

Two CDVs of Union General John F. Reynolds

Two CDVs featuring Union General John Reynolds, including one vignetted bust portrait. EW Addis: Washington, DC; and one oval portrait of the general holding a hat and sword. Hoak & Helm, Strasburg, PA. Two-cent revenue stamp on verso.

A regular with Mexican War and lengthy frontier experience, Reynolds (1820-1863) held a variety of brigade and division-size commands during the first two years of the war before being promoted to major general in November 1862. At Gettysburg, Reynolds had overall command of the vanguard of the Army of the Potomac, consisting of his own 1st Corps (under Doubleday) with the 3rd (Sickles) and 11th (Howard) in echelon. While placing the 2nd Wisconsin on the field during the morning of July 1st, Reynolds was picked off by a rebel sharpshooter and killed.

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$563
11/13/2020

28

Generals Joseph Hooker and William T. Sherman, Pair of CDVs

Lot of 2 CDVs.

CDV portrait in uniform of Union Major General Joseph Hooker, Commander of the Army of the Potomac until his defeat by Confederate General Robert E. Lee at Chancellorsville in 1863. E. & H.T. Anthony / Brady: New York, 1862. Minor spotting/spoiling, mainly in margins.

Seldom seen CDV image of General William Tecumseh Sherman in uniform, seated at a desk. S.M. Fassett’s New Gallery: Chicago, IL, n.d. With two-cent revenue stamp. Toning to image. Insect damage to verso not affecting image. Corner/edge wear to mount, including loss along left edge of mount. 

Estimate: $200 - $400
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,500
11/13/2020

29

Two Composite CDVs of Union Generals Francis J. Herron, CMOH, and A.J. Smith with their Staffs

Lot of 2 composite CDVs. 

CDV featuring oval portrait of Major General Francis J. Herron (1837-1902) at center surrounded by oval quarter-length portraits of ten members of his staff, including Lieutenant W.H. Gladwin, W.H. Clark, Capt. Charles H. Steens, Captain E.E. Stockton, and Surgeon O.M. Humphreys. Theodore Lilienthal: New Orleans, LA, March 6, 1865. Lilienthal's copyright on mount below image and imprint on verso. Herron was awarded CMOH in 1892 for "extraordinary heroism" at Pea Ridge; elevated to divisional command and critical to the Union victory at Wilson's Creek; later commanded the 13th Corps. Toning to image and mount, some soiling. Corner/edge wear to mount. 

CDV featuring Major General Andrew Jackson Smith (1815-1897) at center surrounded by oval quarter-length portraits of ten members of his staff, including Major John Hough, Captain Ross Wilkinson, Captain J.A. Sexton, Captain George W. Baker, and Major Lyon. Moses & Piffet: New Orleans, LA, ca 1864. Two-cent revenue stamp on verso, initialed in ink, "M & P." Smith was a pre-war Indian fighter who rose to command the 16th Corps and fought throughout the South with solid leadership during the Civil War. Toning to image. Corner/edge wear to mount, including light creases in top right and left corners of mount. 

Estimate: $250 - $350
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$438
11/13/2020

30

General Benjamin Butler CDVS, Plus General Orders from New Orleans

Lot of 5, including 4 CDVS plus printed orders, comprising:

Full-length portrait of Butler in uniform holding his sword and hat with one hand. E. Jacobs: New Orleans, n.d. Embossed imprint on recto. 

Half-length portrait of Butler in uniform, seated in profile. E. & H.T. Anthony: New York, n.d. Anthony/Brady 501 Broadway imprint on verso. 

Three-quarter-length portrait of Butler standing in profile, holding his hat. Uncredited. Mounted to large card, 3.5 x 5.5 in.

Vignetted portrait of Butler in uniform, standing in profile. John Clarck: n.p., n.d. Imprint on verso, housed in loose album frame page. 

General Order No. 56. Headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, August 7, 1862. 1 printed page on bifolium. 5.25 x 8.25 in. The document announces the "sad event of the death of Brig. Gen. Thomas Williams, commanding Second Brigade, in Camp, at Baton Rouge," devoting most of the document to Williams' achievements.

 

Estimate: $200 - $300
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$125
11/13/2020

Items 1-31 of 304
Results per page: